Short Wave New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Maddie Sofia for science on a different wavelength.
Short Wave
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Short Wave

From NPR

New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Maddie Sofia for science on a different wavelength.

Most Recent Episodes

The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Micro Wave: Mighty Mice, Drugs And Hopes For Space Voyagers

NPR Science Correspondent Jon Hamilton gives us an update on those mighty mice that went into space this past winter. The results could have big implications for the future of space travel.

Micro Wave: Mighty Mice, Drugs And Hopes For Space Voyagers

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Wearing a face mask Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden talks with members of the United Steelworkers union in a supporter's back yard in Detroit, Michigan. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Short Wave Guide To Biden's Coronavirus Plan

With election season underway, we present a Short Wave guide (with some help from our friends at NPR Politics) to Joe Biden's plan to combat the coronavirus. Political correspondent and NPR Politics Podcast co-host Scott Detrow breaks it down for us.

A Short Wave Guide To Biden's Coronavirus Plan

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ICYMI: 200+ Short Wave Episodes Are Waiting For You

In case you missed our announcement last week, Short Wave is temporarily shifting production schedules. We're publishing episodes in your feed four times each week instead of five. That means we'll be taking a break every Wednesday for a bit.

ICYMI: 200+ Short Wave Episodes Are Waiting For You

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Teri Hines says she had a bout of depression during the lead up to menopause in her mid-40s. For many women, the lead up to menopause can trigger mood issues. Hannah Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Hannah Yoon for NPR

Preparing For Perimenopause: You Don't Have To Do It Alone

Perimenopause, the period of transition to menopause, is still a largely misunderstood chapter of reproductive life. It brings about both physical and mental health changes that doctors rarely educate their patients about. We're joined by health correspondent Rhitu Chatterjee to talk about perimenopause, and how to advocate for yourself as you're going through it.

Preparing For Perimenopause: You Don't Have To Do It Alone

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How Hackers Could Fool Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence might not be as smart as we think. University and military researchers are studying how attackers could hack into AI systems by exploiting how these systems learn. It's known as "adversarial AI." In this encore episode, Dina Temple-Raston tells us that some of these experiments use seemingly simple techniques.

How Hackers Could Fool Artificial Intelligence

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A recent study found that when a Black newborn was cared for by a Black physician, they were less likely to experience death in the hospital setting. Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Key To Black Infant Survival? Black Doctors

In the United States, Black infants die at over twice the rate of White infants. New research explores one key factor that may contribute to the disproportionately high rates of death among Black newborns: the race of their doctor. Reproductive health equity researcher Rachel Hardeman explains the findings.

A Key To Black Infant Survival? Black Doctors

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In his latest piece for The Atlantic, Ed Yong details the "pandemic spiral" the U.S. is caught in, wherein the focus is on one solution at a time rather than a suite of solutions. Gabriel Bouys hide caption

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Gabriel Bouys

How The U.S. Is Caught In A "Pandemic Spiral"

Ed Yong, a science writer for The Atlantic, writes that the U.S. is caught in a "pandemic spiral." He argues some of our intuitions have been misleading our response, rather than guiding us out of disaster. For instance, flitting from from one prominent solution to another, without fully implementing any of them. To counter these unhelpful instincts, he offers some solutions.

How The U.S. Is Caught In A "Pandemic Spiral"

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Miss an episode? Now's your chance to catch up...

In case you missed our announcement Monday, Short Wave is temporarily shifting production schedules. We're dropping episodes into your feed four times a week instead of five. That means we'll be taking a break every Wednesday through the end of the year.

Miss an episode? Now's your chance to catch up...

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More than 140 billion liters of fresh water are estimated to be flushed down the toilet every day. Paolo Cordoni / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Paolo Cordoni / EyeEm/Getty Images

Saving Water A Flush At A Time

Flushing toilets can consume a lot of water. So Tak-Sing Wong, a biomedical engineer at Penn State University, is trying to minimize how much is needed. Wong developed a slippery coating for the inside of a toilet bowl. In this encore episode, he tells us it can potentially move human waste more efficiently, leaving a cleaner bowl with less water.

Saving Water A Flush At A Time

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Mathematician Eugenia Cheng's book X+Y: A Mathematician's Manifesto for Rethinking Gender uses category theory, her field of research, to re-examine the role of gender in society. Basic Books hide caption

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Basic Books

A Mathematician's Manifesto For Rethinking Gender

In her new book, x+y, mathematician Eugenia Cheng uses her specialty, category theory, to challenge how we think about gender and the traits associated with it. Instead, she calls for a new dimension of thinking, characterizing behavior in a way completely removed from considerations of gender.

A Mathematician's Manifesto For Rethinking Gender

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