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Animals

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Micro Wave: Why Mosquitoes Bite You More Than Your Friends

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There is a seemingly never-ending variety of beetles, about 400,000 known species! imv/Getty Images hide caption

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imv/Getty Images

This Is Not A Typo: One In Four Animals Known To Science Is A Beetle

NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce had to know more when she recently heard this mind-bending fact for the first time: a quarter of all known animal species are beetles.

This Is Not A Typo: One In Four Animals Known To Science Is A Beetle

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A wild boar and two of its young roam around Teufelssee, or Devil's Lake, in Germany in August. Ingolf König-Jablonski/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Ingolf König-Jablonski/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

Wild Boars Are Causing Havoc In Germany, But Humans Are Making It Worse

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An unoccupied lifeboat drifts near Kodakarajima island. Japanese authorities are racing to find dozens of missing sailors from a cargo ship that sank in a typhoon. 10th Regional Coast Guard Headquarters/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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10th Regional Coast Guard Headquarters/AFP via Getty Images

Sea turtle hatchlings make their way to the water last month at Al-Mansouri Beach in Lebanon, which is reporting a flourishing turtle population. Yara Khasab /Orange House Project hide caption

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Yara Khasab /Orange House Project

The Gulf Livestock 1 cargo vessel sails through Port Phillip heading into Bass Strait in Australia in April 2019. Japanese rescuers were searching Thursday for the livestock ship carrying more than 40 crew members and thousands of animals. Graham Flett/AP hide caption

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Graham Flett/AP

People have flocked to downtown Nashville, Tenn. the past few days to take in a rare sight: thousands of Purple Martins. The migratory birds, on their way south for the winter, rarely roost in urban areas. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Look Up! Purple Martins Delight Downtown Nashville

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This Bornean horseshoe bat and other bat species can harbor coronaviruses. The nonprofit group EcoHealth Alliance had its NIH research money cut for a project in China on bats and coronaviruses this spring — but just got a new multimillion dollar grant from the agency. NHPA/NHPA/Science Source hide caption

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NHPA/NHPA/Science Source

Bark scorpion (Centruroides exilicauda or C. sculpturatus) and the Northern Grasshopper Mouse (Onychomys leucogaster). Craig K. Lorenz/Science Source; Tom McHugh/Science Source hide caption

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Craig K. Lorenz/Science Source; Tom McHugh/Science Source

Scorpion Vs Mouse: A Mind-Blowing Desert Showdown

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Researchers have spotted the Somali sengi, a relative of aardvarks and elephants, in Djibouti. Steven Heritage/Duke University Lemur Center hide caption

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Steven Heritage/Duke University Lemur Center

Tiny Elephant Shrew Resurfaces After More Than 50 Years On Lost Species List

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Barbijo penguins gather on South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, in 2019. But that's probably not where their ancestors lived. Johan Ordonez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP via Getty Images

The Evolutionary History Of Penguins Is Far From Black And White

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A bald eagle takes flight from a tree along the Platte River in Denver, Colorado. In Michigan, a bald eagle is being blamed for an attack that downed one of the state's drones. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The /Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The /Denver Post via Getty Images

Gray reef sharks hang out together in French Polynesia. Bernard Radvaner/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernard Radvaner/Corbis/Getty Images

Everyone Needs A Buddy. Even Sharks

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An American bald eagle flies over Mill Pond in Centerport, N.Y., in 2018. The bald eagle is one of the birds protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

A new study of Deinosuchus or "terror crocodiles," led by Adam Cosette, offers a fuller picture of the ancient creature from head to tail. Cossette said Deinosuchus had large, robust teeth, ranging from six to eight inches long, as shown in the photo. Adam Cossette hide caption

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Adam Cossette

Staff at the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores turned off a 30-foot waterfall and collected all the coins visitors had thrown into the water to make wishes. After cleaning the money, they'll put it toward the aquarium's expenses. Liz Baird/Courtesy of North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores hide caption

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Liz Baird/Courtesy of North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores

Aquarium Is Washing Old Wishes To Pay Bills During Pandemic

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