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Nurses clap after Kym Villamer and her colleague Dawn Jones sing "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" at New York-Presbyterian Queens Hospital's new COVID-19 ward. Robert Gonzales hide caption

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Robert Gonzales

Family Ordeal Catapults A Young Filipina To The U.S. — And The Pandemic Front Lines

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A South Korean fisheries patrol boat seen off Yeonpyeong Island on Thursday, near North Korean waters. South Korean officials say a fisheries inspector working on the boat disappeared Monday and was killed by North Korean troops. Choi Jin-suk/Newsis via AP hide caption

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Choi Jin-suk/Newsis via AP

Dao Thi Hoa, right, chairwoman of the Intergenerational Self Help Club in the Khuong Din ward of Hanoi in Vietnam, checks the club's account book with other members. Nguyễn Văn Hốt hide caption

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Nguyễn Văn Hốt

Public opinion surveys show that Chinese and U.S. respondents show increasingly negative attitudes toward each other's countries. In China, reported levels of satisfaction with the Chinese government have grown. Veronaa/Getty Images hide caption

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Veronaa/Getty Images

As U.S. Views Of China Grow More Negative, Chinese Support For Their Government Rises

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Demonstrators strike an effigy of President Trump outside the U.S. Consulate in Hong Kong during a May protest, following Trump's executive order aimed at revoking visas of Chinese nationals studying in the United States. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

As U.S. Revokes Chinese Students' Visas, Concerns Rise About Loss Of Research Talent

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Taiwan's Foreign Minister Joseph Wu, shown at a news conference last November, says he sees the possibility of closer relations with the U.S. Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook says the fake accounts it removed focused mainly on Southeast Asia. But they also included some content about the U.S. election, which did not gain a large following. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Ren Zhiqiang seen at a business conference in Beijing in 2008. Ren was sentenced to 18 years in prison Tuesday for corruption following his public criticism of Chinese President Xi Jinping and the Chinese Communist Party. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

A federal judge in San Francisco has blocked the Trump administration's order that would have banned Chinese-owned app WeChat, which millions in the U.S. use to stay in touch with family and friends and conduct business in China Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

A health worker wearing protective gear collects a swab sample during a medical screening for the coronavirus in Mumbai on Wednesday. The number of registered coronavirus cases passed 5 million on Wednesday. Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images

Yoshihide Suga receives applause Wednesday after being elected as Japan's new prime minister at Parliament's lower house in Tokyo. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

Yoshihide Suga Becomes Japan's Prime Minister, Pledging To Follow Abe's Course

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A sign (left) outside a Mongolian-language school in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, reads: "When the people have conviction, the state has strength and the ethnic minorities have hope." The sign at right says: "Rule of law." Emily Feng/NPR hide caption

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Emily Feng/NPR

Parents Keep Children Home As China Limits Mongolian Language In The Classroom

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Members of conservative right-wing and Christian groups take part in an anti-government rally in Seoul on Aug. 15. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

The Volatile Mix Of A South Korean Church, Politics And The Coronavirus

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Politicians gathered at India's Parliament House ahead of the first session in six months, on Sept. 13 in New Delhi. Lawmakers were required to get tested for the coronavirus within 72 hours before entering parliament. Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Cosmos Karaoke is a lively karaoke bar in the middle of Namie, a small city that is slowly reopening after the 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident devastated the area. Minza Lee (right) is the driving force behind the bar. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A Karaoke Bar Is Helping A Japanese Town Come Back To Life After Fukushima Disaster

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Tomoko stands at the inn in Fukushima prefecture that has been in her family for generations. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Fukushima Has Turned These Grandparents Into Avid Radiation Testers

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On Jan. 23, workers started building the Huoshenshan hospital for COVID-19 patients in Wuhan, China. The photo above was taken on Jan. 30. Construction was done on Feb. 2, and the 1,000-bed hospital opened on Feb. 3. Today it stands empty of patients. Stringer/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/Getty Images