Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

Code SwitchCode Switch

Race. In your face.

From left, José Yadiel Torres, 10, Lizmary Rivera, 29, José Torres, 38, and twins Janniela and Jamiléth Torres, 9, pose for a family portrait in their house in Utuado. The rooster, the family's most prized bird, is named Matatoro. Erika P. Rodrí­guez for NPR hide caption

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Erika P. Rodrí­guez for NPR

An Alabama helmet on December 31, 2016, at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, GA. Scott Donaldson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Donaldson/Getty Images

Should Black Athletes Go To Black Schools?

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Elena Hinestrosa and her ensemble, Integración Pacífica, perform at one of Petronio Alvarez Music Festival's educational panels. Maria Paz Gutierrez hide caption

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Maria Paz Gutierrez

Colombia's Big Summer Music Festival Is All About Blackness

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Trans people in the U.S. have turned to underground silicone injections for decades. And it has particularly impacted trans women of color and those living in poverty. Anke Gladnick for NPR hide caption

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Anke Gladnick for NPR

Isabela Moner stars as Dora in Dora and the Lost City of Gold Vince Valitutti/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Vince Valitutti/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Dora The Explorer's Lasting Impact

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Members of the Japanese American Mochida family, in Hayward, Calif., await relocation to an incarceration camp during World War II. Dorothea Lange/Getty Images hide caption

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Dorothea Lange/Getty Images

Catalina Saenz wipes tears from her face as she visits a makeshift memorial near the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex in El Paso, Texas. A list of the people who died in the weekend shooting rampage at the Walmart, shows that most of the victims had Latino surnames and included one German national. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Armed National Guards and African American men standing on a sidewalk during the race riots in Chicago, Illinois, 1919. Jun Fujita/Courtesy of the Chicago History Museum hide caption

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Jun Fujita/Courtesy of the Chicago History Museum

Red Summer In Chicago: 100 Years After The Race Riots

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