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A man waves an upside-down American flag during a protest in Las Vegas following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Joe Biden makes a visit to a veterans memorial in Delaware last Monday. He made his second trip away from his home since the pandemic started on Sunday with a visit to a protest site in Wilmington, Del. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Postal Service faces challenges as more voters turn to mail in ballots during the coronavirus pandemic. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

As More Americans Prepare To Vote By Mail, Postal Service Faces Big Challenges

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U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had been approached to run for the U.S. Senate from Kansas, but he has demurred. The filing deadline for the Aug. 4 primary is Monday. Nicholas Kamm/AP hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AP

Sen. Bernie Sanders signs autographs at a February campaign event with Latino supporters in Santa Ana, Calif. Some Democrats say the Biden campaign can learn from Sanders' outreach. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

An election worker in Dallas setting up a polling place ahead of the March 3 in Texas. Texas officials are resisting efforts to expand mail-in voting due to the pandemic and insisting that voters cast ballots in person in upcoming elections. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Texas Voters Are Caught In The Middle Of A Battle Over Mail-In Voting

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A 2019 naturalization ceremony in Lowell, Mass. The pandemic has put such ceremonies on hold in an election year when many new citizens vote for the first time. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Since Russia's expansive influence operation during the 2016 election, Americans' usage of social media has only increased — and drastically so, as a result of the pandemic. Caroline Amenabar/NPR hide caption

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Caroline Amenabar/NPR

Social Media Usage Is At An All-Time High. That Could Mean A Nightmare For Democracy

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Candidate Donald Trump makes a dramatic entrance on the first night of the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland. His campaign hopes to replicate the scale of that event to demonstrate a recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Trump's Threat To Move Convention Causes Overnight Scramble

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With months to go until the 2020 election, the presidential transition process is already underway. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Behind The Scenes, Presidential Transition Planning Is Underway

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A voter registration volunteer in Philadelphia in 2018. New registrations had surged going into 2020 but have dropped off dramatically as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Dominick Reuter/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP via Getty Images

Pandemic Puts A Crimp On Voter Registration, Potentially Altering Electorate

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A tour bus, sponsored by the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, pulls up to a Miami-Dade County courthouse ahead of a hearing aimed at restoring the right to vote under Florida's Amendment 4 on Nov. 8, 2019. Zak Bennett/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Zak Bennett/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., attends a press conference on Feb. 26 on Capitol Hill. Omar tells NPR the progressive left "has moved the needle on the national conversation" surrounding certain policies. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Ilhan Omar On Her Memoir And Moving The Needle Toward Progressive Policies

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, pictured on March 12, is facing backlash for comments that his campaign says were a joke about black support for him versus President Trump. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images