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Latin America

A women's movement activist holds a sign that reads in Portuguese "Genocide 60 thousand deaths, Bolsonaro out" during a protest against the government's handling of the pandemic earlier this month. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has repeatedly doubted the severity of the virus since it first found a foothold in Brazil, reportedly in late February. Andressa Anholete/Getty Images hide caption

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Andressa Anholete/Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, seen here last month in Mexico City, will visit President Trump at the White House this week. Hector Vivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Vivas/Getty Images

Mexico's President Weathers A Torrent Of Criticism Over Meeting With Trump

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A nurse protests Chile's handling of the coronavirus pandemic. The country now has the highest per capita infection rate of any major country — 13,000 cases for every 1 million people. Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

How Chile Ended Up With One Of The Highest COVID-19 Rates

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(L to R): Sen. Heherson Alvarez, an environmental lawmaker from the Philippines; Durdana Rizvi, a doctor from Pakistan; Colombian actor Antonio Bolívar; 'Nanī' Nabi, a grandmother from Kashmir; Rocio Choque, a soup kitchen volunteer from Argentina. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters; Andaleeb Rizvi; Lucas Jackson/Reuters; Javaid Iqbal; Anita Pouchard Serra for NPR hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/Reuters; Andaleeb Rizvi; Lucas Jackson/Reuters; Javaid Iqbal; Anita Pouchard Serra for NPR

Shoppers browse at an electronics store in Bogotá, Colombia, on June 19. Shoppers flocked to Colombian shopping malls to take advantage of a day without value added tax, which triggered Black Friday-style shopping frenzies. Nathalia Angarita /Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nathalia Angarita /Bloomberg via Getty Images

In Colombia, Tax-Free Holidays Lead Critics To Decry 'COVID Friday'

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A view of Rocinha, Rio de Janeiro's largest favela, in March. A recent study showed almost 1 in 4 of those tested in Rocinha was infected with the coronavirus. Silvia Izquierdo/AP hide caption

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Silvia Izquierdo/AP

Two children watch a national address by Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández on Tuesday, during which he confirmed he tested positive for the coronavirus. Orlando Sierra/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP via Getty Images

Several COVID-19 burials are performed in the Vila Formosa Cemetery on the east side of São Paulo, Brazil, on Sunday. Brazil, which reported a large spike in cases on Monday, now ranks second after the U.S. for total infections and deaths. Fotoarena/Sipa USA via AP hide caption

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Fotoarena/Sipa USA via AP

A Colombian Huitoto man sails on a raft along the Takana river in Leticia, Amazonas department, Colombia, on May 20, during the coronavirus pandemic. Tatiana de Nevó/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tatiana de Nevó/AFP via Getty Images

The Coronavirus Is Spreading Through Indigenous Communities In The Amazon

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A woman walks amid symbolic graves on Copacabana Beach, dug by activists from the NGO Rio de Paz protesting the government's handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday. Leo Correa/AP hide caption

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Leo Correa/AP

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, seen greeting supporters late last month in Brasilia, has argued that the economic fallout from stay-at-home orders is worse than the virus itself. Evaristo Sa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Evaristo Sa/AFP via Getty Images

With access to medical care limited during the pandemic, patients in countries where abortion is legal, such as Colombia, the United Kingdom and the United States, are turning to telemedicine for a prescription for drugs like mifeprostone and misoprostol to end a pregnancy. Photo Illustration by Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A Maasai man in the Kibera slum of Nairobi, Kenya, prays next to a mural of George Floyd, painted by the artist Allan Mwangi on June 3. Gordwin Odhiambo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gordwin Odhiambo/AFP via Getty Images

Commuters at the Luz station in São Paulo. Brazil has the world's second-highest number of COVID-19 cases after the U.S. Pacific Press/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Ge hide caption

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Pacific Press/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Ge

People in the Andean city of Puno, Peru, lined up earlier this month to withdraw funds from their pensions. The World Food Programme says the number of people experiencing severe food insecurity in Latin America and the Caribbean could quadruple. Carlos Mamani /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Carlos Mamani /AFP via Getty Images

Residents of the Colombian capital Bogotá hang red rags from their windows and balconies to signal their need for help with food during the coronavirus pandemic. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images

During Colombia's Coronavirus Lockdown, Needy Residents Signal SOS With Red Rags

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro is seen at a demonstration in favor of his government on Sunday. Andressa Anholete/Getty Images hide caption

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Andressa Anholete/Getty Images

Liege Camila Pistore Veras, Rafael Duckur, and Joana Luiza Mendes (left to right) load boxes of produce into a truck at a farm outside of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This produce, and more, will be distributed in favelas, poor urban neighborhoods where residents live in crowded homes and lack basic sanitation. Patrícia Monteiro for NPR hide caption

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Patrícia Monteiro for NPR