Research News New advances in science, medicine, health, and technology.Stem cell research, drug research, and new treatments for disease.

Research News

African Americans and other underrepresented minorities make up only about 5% of the people in genetics research studies. janiecbros/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
janiecbros/Getty Images

Neuroscience Has A Whiteness Problem. This Research Project Aims To Fix It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/915783973/916625460" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers in Miami hold syringes containing either a placebo or the candidate COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna. Their work is part of a phase three clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Taimy Alvarez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Taimy Alvarez/AP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention briefly posted new guidance to its website stating that the coronavirus can commonly be transmitted through aerosol particles, which can be produced by activities like singing. Here, choristers wear face masks during a music festival in southwestern France in July. Bob Edme/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bob Edme/AP

Niticia Mpanga, a registered respiratory therapist, checks on an ICU patient at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas. The mortality rates from COVID-19 in ICUs have been decreasing worldwide, doctors say, at least partly because of recent advances in treatment. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/914374901/914949310" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A recent study found that when a Black newborn was cared for by a Black physician, they were less likely to experience death in the hospital setting. Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Scientists used light to control the firing of specific cells to artificially create a rhythm in the brain that acted like the drug ketamine enjoynz/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
enjoynz/Getty Images

Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/913565163/913693842" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People wait for a bus in August in East Los Angeles. Latinos have the highest rate of labor force participation of any group in California — many in public-facing jobs deemed essential. That work has put them at higher risk of catching the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

A child washes her hands at a day care center in Connecticut last month. A detailed look at COVID-19 deaths in U.S. kids and young adults by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the great majority are children of color. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Hill/AP

Social psychologist Keith Payne says we have a bias toward comparing ourselves to people who have more than us, rather than those who have less Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The images used to create this view of Venus were acquired by the Mariner 10 craft on Feb. 7 and 8, 1974. Decades after the Mariner 2 flew by the planet in 1962, much about the planet remains unknown. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

A Possible Sign Of Life Right Next Door To Earth, On Venus

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/912619891/912791485" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Earlier in the week, AstraZeneca had paused worldwide studies of its candidate vaccine after one U.K. participant developed symptoms consistent with the spinal cord inflammation known as transverse myelitis. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alastair Grant/AP
Jesse Zhang for NPR

A COVID-19 Vaccine May Be Only 50% Effective. Is That Good Enough?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/911987987/912612344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Jose Luis Pelaez Inc/Getty Images

As COVID-19 Vaccine Trials Move At Warp Speed, Recruiting Black Volunteers Takes Time

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/911885577/912080828" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Kim Ryu for NPR

'I Try So Hard Not To Cry': Nearly Half Of U.S. Households Face A Financial Crisis

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/910724801/911185462" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The AstraZeneca/Oxford partnership is one of the vaccine development efforts that is furthest along. The company recently began a Phase 3 trial in the United States that aims to enroll 30,000 volunteers. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alastair Grant/AP

Romanesco broccoli, as seen by a 3.2 billion pixel camera. Scientists chose to take a picture of the broccoli because of its fractal shape. LSST Camera team/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory/Rubin Observatory hide caption

toggle caption
LSST Camera team/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory/Rubin Observatory

California Scientists Build A Camera To Take Pictures Of Huge Swath Of Sky

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/910761101/910788790" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. A drug to achieve the same effect was recently tested in space. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

toggle caption
Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Drug That Bulked Up Mice In Space Might Someday Help Astronauts Make Long Voyages

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/910776985/910779534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A recent survey found 62% of people in the U.S. with anorexia experienced a worsening of symptoms after the pandemic hit. And nearly a third of Americans with binge-eating disorder, which is far more common, reported an increase in episodes. Boogich/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Boogich/Getty Images

Eating Disorders Thrive In Anxious Times, And Pose A Lethal Threat

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/908994616/910643396" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

An STS-125 crew member onboard the space shuttle Atlantis snaps a still photo of the Hubble Space Telescope following grapple of the giant observatory by the shuttle. Johnson Space Center/NASA hide caption

toggle caption
Johnson Space Center/NASA

The Hubble Space Telescope Still Works Great — Except When It Doesn't

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/909199421/910499302" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This negative-stained transmission electron micrograph depicts the ultrastructural details of an influenza virus particle, or virion. Frederick Murphy/CDC hide caption

toggle caption
Frederick Murphy/CDC

Flu Season Looms And Scientists Wonder How Flu And COVID-19 Might Mix

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/909000378/909312864" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Studies of steroids, including the generic drug dexamethasone, have found that these drugs can reduce deaths in patients hospitalized with serious cases of COVID-19. Photo Illustration by Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Photo Illustration by Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Inexpensive Steroids Can Save Lives Of Seriously Ill COVID-19 Patients

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/908763639/908959898" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Patients with a fast-progressing form of ALS who got daily doses of an experimental two-drug combination called AMX0035 scored higher on a standard measure of function than patients who didn't get the drug. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Zephyr/Science Source

Drug Combination Slows Progression Of ALS And Could Mark 'New Era' In Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/908874110/908874111" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript