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Coronavirus Pandemic Halts Climate Data Collection

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Scientists Discover Enzyme That Could Result In A Drug Substitute For Exercise

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Scientists Discover A New Formula To Calculate A Dog's Age In Human Years

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Faced with a rat trapped in a restrainer, a free rat opens the trap's door to liberate the trapped animal (while stepping on its head — "very rat-ish behavior," says University of Chicago neurobiologist Peggy Mason). David Christopher/University of Chicago hide caption

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David Christopher/University of Chicago

To Come To The Rescue Or Not? Rats, Like People, Take Cues From Bystanders

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Antigen Test For COVID-19 Isn't As Reliable As Genetic Test, Experts Caution

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This light micrograph from the brain of someone who died with Alzheimer's disease shows the plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that are typical of the disease. A glitch that prevents healthy cell structures from transitioning from one phase to the next might contribute to the tangles, researchers say. Jose Luis Calvo/ Science Source hide caption

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Jose Luis Calvo/ Science Source

A researcher at Peking University's Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics conducts tests on May 14. Scientists are confronting their biases and learning to engage with science from places they're unfamiliar with. Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images

The Pandemic Is Pushing Scientists To Rethink How They Read Research Papers

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In 2009, Australia's deadliest bushfires on record destroyed Kinglake, a town just over an hour's drive northeast of Melbourne. The disaster had long-term effects on families. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Scientist Makes A Discovery That May Lead To New Drugs For Rare Brain Diseases

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A flooded street in Orange, Texas in 2017. Climate-driven extreme rain and sea level rise, coupled with development in flood-prone areas, have led to more competition for limited federal flood mitigation dollars. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of protective equipment she wears when treating patients. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Georgia Tech, pictured in 2016, will be holding some in-person classes in the fall. Faculty are upset that face coverings will not be mandatory. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP