The NPR Politics Podcast Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

The NPR Politics Podcast

From NPR

Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

Most Recent Episodes

Border Patrol agents talk with migrants seeking asylum as they prepare them for transportation to be processed, Wednesday, June 5, 2024, near Dulzura, Calif. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Biden launches new immigration action

In an executive action released today, President Biden announced plans to offer protection against deportation to an estimated half a million undocumented spouses of U.S. citizens, and noncitizen minors & stepchildren of American citizens. It would also allow eligible immigrants to apply for legal permanent status.

Biden launches new immigration action

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People arrive before Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump speaks at the "People's Convention" of Turning Point Action Saturday, June 15, 2024 in Detroit. Carlos Osorio/Detroit hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/Detroit

Does Trump have the rizz?

Young voters historically vote for Democrats. But, former President Trump's style and rhetoric are drawing attention among some casting their first ballots. We went to a conservative convention in Detroit to learn more.

Does Trump have the rizz?

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Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump speaks with reporters at the National Republican Senatorial Committee, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Washington. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Politics Roundup: Trump on the Hill, older voters in Florida

Donald Trump returned to Capitol Hill for the first time since his supporters disrupted the peaceful transfer of power on Jan. 6, 2021. The event was a clear demonstration of how the party has coalesced entirely behind him.

Politics Roundup: Trump on the Hill, older voters in Florida

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The Supreme Court on October 4, 2023. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Supreme Court punts on abortion pill access.

In a unanimous decision, the justices ruled that the litigants did not have standing to bring the case. But there will more challenges to abortion access ahead, including another pending case this term.

Supreme Court punts on abortion pill access.

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Inside the Arizona State Capitol, Tuesday, June 4, 2024, in Phoenix after the Arizona legislature gave final approval to a the proposal that will ask voters to make it a state crime for noncitizens to enter the state through Mexico at any location other than a port of entry. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

In Arizona, will abortion access and immigration ballot measures drive turnout?

As abortion access advocates canvas the state gathering signatures to get a ballot initiative in front of voters, Republican lawmakers in Arizona advanced an immigration enforcement referendum of their own. Both are likely to drive turnout in November's election, though figuring out exactly who that benefits is complicated.

In Arizona, will abortion access and immigration ballot measures drive turnout?

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President Joe Biden stands with his son Hunter Biden, left, as he looks at a plaque dedicated to his late son Beau Biden while visiting Mayo Roscommon Hospice in County Mayo, Ireland, Friday, April 14, 2023. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Trump attacks the DOJ as "rigged." It just convicted Hunter Biden of three felonies.

Hunter Biden, the president's son, has been convicted on three felony charges tied to his purchase of a firearm while addicted to illegal drugs. President Biden says he will not pardon his son.

Trump attacks the DOJ as "rigged." It just convicted Hunter Biden of three felonies.

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Nikki Haley, second from left, then South Carolina Gov.-elect, is seated with Vice President Joe Biden during a luncheon at the Blair House across from the White House in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Nikki Haley has backed Donald Trump, but Biden is making a play for her voters

The Biden campaign has hired a former Republican congressional chief-of-staff to lead its outreach to Republican voters, but interviews and polling suggest that, even despite Donald Trump's felony convictions, Nikki Haley's supporters are likely to back the former president come November.

Nikki Haley has backed Donald Trump, but Biden is making a play for her voters

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Hunter Biden departs from federal court, Monday, June 3, 2024, in Wilmington, Del. Matt Slocum /AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum /AP

Politics Roundup: Hunter Biden trial, congressional races

The president's son is being tried on federal firearm charges for allegedly lying about his drug use when he bought a gun in 2018. And as presidential primary season concludes, we turn our attention to the congressional races likely to determine control of the House and Senate.

Politics Roundup: Hunter Biden trial, congressional races

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Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., speaks in front of President Donald Trump during a campaign rally, Feb. 28, 2020, in North Charleston, S.C. Patrick Semansky /AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky /AP

Trump still faces dozens of charges, but more verdicts won't come before the election

The state charges in Georgia are on ice as Donald Trump and his team pursue an appeal, with initial arguments set for October. In the near term, Trump will need to select a vice presidential candidate and Sen. Tim Scott is making his case with a $14 million dollar effort to persuade Black voters.

Trump still faces dozens of charges, but more verdicts won't come before the election

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In this photo released by the Taiwan Presidential Office, Taiwan President Lai Ching-te, right, shares a light moment with Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas after receiving a cowboy hat in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, May 27, 2024. Taiwan Presidential Office/AP hide caption

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Taiwan Presidential Office/AP

US & Taiwan: countering China, protecting a democracy, securing shipping routes

In the landmark bipartisan foreign aid package that passed earlier this year, there was money for two allies in ongoing military conflicts: Israel and Ukraine. But there was also money for the Indo-Pacific region. So why is the U.S. interested in the region and how is Taiwan involved?

US & Taiwan: countering China, protecting a democracy, securing shipping routes

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