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A large disturbance in the sea can be observed Tuesday off the coast of the Danish island of Bornholm following unusual leaks in two natural gas pipelines running from Russia under the Baltic Sea to Germany. Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen says she "cannot rule out" sabotage on Nord Stream 1 and Nord Stream 2. Danish Defence Command via AP hide caption

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Danish Defence Command via AP

Hilaree Nelson of Telluride, Colorado, left and James Morrison of Tahoe, California, raise their fists as the pair arrived in Kathmandu, Nepal, in 2018. Rescuers in a helicopter were searching on the world's eighth-highest mountain Tuesday for Nelson, the famed U.S. ski mountaineer, a day after her trip organizer said she fell off the mountain near the peak. Niranjan Shrestha/AP hide caption

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Niranjan Shrestha/AP

Konstantin Ivashchenko, former CEO of the Azovmash plant and appointed pro-Russian mayor of Mariupol, visits a polling station as people vote in a referendum in Mariupol on Tuesday. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Magnus Carlsen says he will not play Hans Niemann again because he believes Niemann "has cheated more — and more recently — than he has publicly admitted." Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images

A Steag coal power plant in Herne, Germany, on Aug. 25. The Essen-based energy company Steag wanted to convert the old coal-fired power plant Herne 4 into a gas-fired power plant at the beginning of the year. In March, Steag decided to postpone the conversion and to continue firing the old power plant with coal. Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images

A picture obtained by AFP outside Iran on Sept. 21 shows Iranian demonstrators in Tehran during a protest for Mahsa Amini, days after she died in police custody. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

The protests won't lead to regime change, Iran's foreign minister tells NPR

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A cemetery worker takes a rest from working on the graves of civilians killed in Bucha during the war with Russia, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, in April. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Journalists are being trained to gather evidence of war crimes — starting in Ukraine

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Leslie Grace (left), Antonio Banderas, Lynda Carter, Xochitl Gomez, Miles Morales (voiced by Shameik Moore), El Santo and Xolo Maridueña have played or are in production to play superheroes. Mike Gallegos for NPR hide caption

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Mike Gallegos for NPR

Latino superheroes are saving the day in Hollywood

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Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro greets supporters during a reelection campaign rally. Ahead of the first round of voting on Oct. 2, Bolsonaro has baselessly claimed that voting machines will be rigged against him, an echo of former U.S. President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election. Fred Magno/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Magno/Getty Images

Brazilians are about to vote. And they're dealing with familiar viral election lies

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Akie Abe, wife of former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, carries a cinerary urn containing his ashes at his state funeral, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022, in Tokyo. Franck Robichon/AP hide caption

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Franck Robichon/AP

Japan holds a controversial state funeral for former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

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