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Harlan Gough holds a recently collected tiger beetle on a tether. Lawrence Reeves hide caption

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Lawrence Reeves

To escape hungry bats, these flying beetles create an ultrasound 'illusion'

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Earlier this year, Virginia designated July as Uterine Fibroids Awareness Month. Tatyana Antusenok/Getty Images hide caption

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Tatyana Antusenok/Getty Images

Up to 80 percent of women will have a uterine fibroid by age 50

Fibroids are benign uterine tumors. So why does it matter that the majority of people with a uterus will have one before they are 50 years old? Physician Rachell Bervell, founder of the Black OBGYN Project, explains that when symptoms arise, they can be quite serious — from extreme menstrual bleeding to fertility problems. Plus, why they're very likely to affect you or a loved one.

Up to 80 percent of women will have a uterine fibroid by age 50

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The Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is seen in this undated image from NASA. Areas of the glacier may be undergoing "vigorous melting" from warm ocean water caused by climate change, researchers say. NASA via Reuters hide caption

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NASA via Reuters

Father and son are now caregiver and care recipient. Robert Turner, Sr. was cheerful even though his day started with being discharged from the hospital. Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR

Black men are a hidden segment of caregivers. It's stressful but rewarding, too

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A sea otter in Monterey Bay with a rock anvil on its belly and a scallop in its forepaws. Jessica Fujii hide caption

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Jessica Fujii

When sea otters lose their favorite foods, they can use tools to go after new ones

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wildestanimal/Getty Images

Sperm whale families talk a lot. Researchers are trying to decode what they're saying

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Ed Dwight poses for a portrait to promote the National Geographic documentary film "The Space Race" during the Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour, Thursday, in February. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP
Aline Ranaivoson/AFP via Getty Images

Travis Kelce of the Kansas City Chiefs embraces Taylor Swift after defeating the San Francisco 49ers during this year's Super Bowl in Las Vegas. Swift, who flew in from Tokyo to attend the game, jokingly told him, "jet lag is a choice." Ezra Shaw/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

The Hubble Space Telescope in 2009, locked in a space shuttle's cargo bay, before the final repair work ever done. NASA/JSC hide caption

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NASA/JSC

Private mission to save the Hubble Space Telescope raises concerns, NASA emails show

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A burial team in Liberia awaits decontamination after performing "safe burials" for people who died of Ebola during the 2014-15 outbreak. Strains of the virus are harbored by bats and primates. A new study looks at how human activity affects the transmission of infectious diseases like Ebola. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

In college, Amylyx cofounders Josh Cohen and Justin Klee dreamed of finding a treatment for diseases like ALS. When their drug's promise did not pan out, they pulled it voluntarily from the market. Amylyx Pharmaceuticals hide caption

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Amylyx Pharmaceuticals

Lots of drug companies talk about putting patients first — but this one actually did

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Gabi Musat/Getty Images

Why a changing climate might mean less chocolate in the future

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Jackye Lafon, who's in her 80s, cools herself with a water spray at her home in Toulouse, France during a heat wave in 2022. Older people face higher heat risk than those who are younger. Climate change is making heat risk even greater. Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images

More than 200 million seniors face extreme heat risks in coming decades, study finds

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Dr. Thorsten Siess shows the Impella. Annegret Hilse/Reuters hide caption

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Annegret Hilse/Reuters

He invented a successful medical device as a student. Here's his advice for new grads

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Lauren Hill, a graduate student at Cal State LA, holds a bird at the bird banding site at Bear Divide in the San Gabriel Mountains. Grace Widyatmadja/NPR hide caption

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Grace Widyatmadja/NPR

On this unassuming trail near LA, bird watchers see something spectacular

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Research shows kids who spend two hours a day outside are less likely to develop myopia. nazar_ab/Getty Images hide caption

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nazar_ab/Getty Images

Want to protect your kids' eyes from myopia? Get them to play outside

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The inside of a cell is a complicated orchestration of interactions between molecules. Keith Chambers/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Keith Chambers/Science Photo Library

AI gets scientists one step closer to mapping the organized chaos in our cells

As artificial intelligence seeps into some realms of society, it rushes into others. One area it's making a big difference is protein science — as in the "building blocks of life," proteins! Producer Berly McCoy talks to host Emily Kwong about the newest advance in protein science: AlphaFold3, an AI program from Google DeepMind. Plus, they talk about the wider field of AI protein science and why researchers hope it will solve a range of problems, from disease to the climate.

AI gets scientists one step closer to mapping the organized chaos in our cells

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