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Sterling Raspe was born with a rare heart defect and underwent eight months of intensive treatment before she passed away. The Raspes were left to deal with millions of dollars in medical bills after her death. Kingsley Raspe hide caption

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Kingsley Raspe

The Heartbreak And Cost Of Losing A Baby In America

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A group shot of Freedom House paramedics. Heinz History Center hide caption

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Heinz History Center

At Freedom House, these Black men saved lives. Paramedics are book topic

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Montana health officials are seeking to increase oversight of nonprofit hospitals amid debate about whether they pay their fair share. The proposal comes nine months after a KHN investigation found that some of Montana's wealthiest hospitals, such as the Billings Clinic, lag behind state and national averages in community giving. Lynn Donaldson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Lynn Donaldson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The White House is proposing pilot programs for Medicare to cover medically tailored meals — like the ones in this file photo — as well as nutrition and obesity counselling. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Allison Case is a family medicine physician who is licensed to practice in both Indiana and New Mexico. Via telehealth appointments, she's used her dual license in the past to help some women who have driven from Texas to New Mexico, where abortion is legal, to get their prescription for abortion medication. Then came Indiana's abortion ban. Farah Yousry/ Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/ Side Effects Public Media

Bupe Sinkala of Zambia was diagnosed with HIV shortly before her wedding, didn't tell her fiance — and later saw her life come tumbling down. With the support of family and a new job as a community health worker, she has found joy. She shared her views on the import of community health work at the U.N. General Assembly this week. Laylah Amatullah Barrayn for NPR hide caption

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Laylah Amatullah Barrayn for NPR

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden pack food boxes while volunteering on Martin Luther King, Jr., Day of Service in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Jan. 16, 2022. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

A photo from June 17 shows empty formula shelves at a supermarket in Florida. An internal review found several factors contributed to the national baby formula shortage, but no one person or agency was listed as at fault. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Health officials are predicting this winter could see an active flu season on top of potential COVID surges. In short, it's a good year to be a respiratory virus. Left: Image of SARS-CoV-2 omicron virus particles (pink) replicating within an infected cell (teal). Right: Image of an inactive H3N2 influenza virus. NIAID/Science Source hide caption

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NIAID/Science Source

Flu is expected to flare up in U.S. this winter, raising fears of a 'twindemic'

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Bennett Markow looks to his big brother, Eli (right), during a family visit at UC Davis Children's Hospital in Sacramento. Bennett was born four months early, in November 2020. Crissa Markow hide caption

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Crissa Markow

The heartbreak and cost of losing a baby in America

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Sean Murphy, lead author of a new malaria vaccine study, demonstrates how participants got their dose: by placing an arm over a mesh-covered container filled with 200 mosquitoes whose bites delivered genetically modified malaria parasites. Annette M Seilie hide caption

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Annette M Seilie

The drugmaker Amylyx is asking the FDA to approve a new medication for ALS, a fatal neurodegenerative disease. It's possible the agency could greenlight the drug by the end of the month. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

FDA seems poised to approve a new drug for ALS, but does it work?

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Supplies for patients at OnPoint NYC, one of the only supervised injection clinics in the U.S. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images

The Experiment Aiming To Keep Drug Users Alive By Helping Them Get High More Safely

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Simply improving our breathing can significantly lower high blood pressure at any age. Recent research finds that just five to 10 minutes daily of exercises that strengthen the diaphragm and certain other muscles does the trick. SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR

Daily 'breath training' can work as well as medicine to reduce high blood pressure

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Volunteers from McQuaid Jesuit High School play basketball with the children of Cameron Community Ministries' after-school program. Max Schulte/WXXI News hide caption

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Max Schulte/WXXI News

Many children are regularly exposed to gun violence. Here's how to help them heal

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A pharmacist prepares to administer COVID-19 vaccine booster shots during an event hosted by the Chicago Department of Public Health at the Southwest Senior Center on September 09, 2022 in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

How Biden's declaring the pandemic 'over' complicates efforts to fight COVID

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