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Health

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A cheap drug may slow down aging. A study will determine if it works

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Although matzo sold in supermarkets is typically square, the round matzo is believed to be the earliest form of this unleavened bread that is eaten during the Passover holiday as a symbol of both suffering and freedom. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images

A new study finds that front yards with friendly features, such as pink flamingos or porch furniture, are correlated with happier, more connected neighbors and a greater "sense of place." ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP via Getty Images

Surviving children of the Auschwitz concentration camp, one of the camps the Nazis had set up to exterminate Jews and kill millions of others. Research into the appropriate way to "re-feed" those who've experienced starvation was prompted by the deaths of camp survivors after liberation. ullstein bild/Getty Images hide caption

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ullstein bild/Getty Images

What World War II taught us about how to help starving people today

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When the media covers scientific research, not all scientists are equally likely to be mentioned. A new study finds scientists with Asian or African names were 15% less likely to be named in a story. shironosov/Getty Images hide caption

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shironosov/Getty Images

The CDC and FDA are investigating reports of patients in nearly a dozen U.S. states being injected with counterfeit Botox. Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump speaks at a rally outside Schnecksville Fire Hall in Schnecksville, Pennsylvania. Andrew Harnik/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Getty Images

Trump's anti-abortion stance helped him win in 2016. Will it hurt him in 2024?

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In March, mom Indira Navas learned that her son Andres, 6, was kicked off of Florida Medicaid, while her daughter, Camila, 12, was still covered. The family is one of millions dealing with Medicaid red tape this year. Javier Ojeda hide caption

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Javier Ojeda

The grass pea — Lathyrus sativus — is hardy and drought resistant. It tastes like a sugar snap pea, although if that's all you were to eat its natural toxin could make you sick. But breeders might be able to address that issue. Sadasiba Behera/Getty Images hide caption

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Sadasiba Behera/Getty Images

What are 'orphan crops'? And why is there a new campaign to get them adopted?

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Wildfire smoke covered huge swaths of the U.S. in 2023, including places like New York City, where it has historically been uncommon. New research shows the health costs of breathing in wildfire smoke can be high. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Aaron Hunter doing physical therapy at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital's outpatient center in Sarasota on Oct. 12, 2023. After getting shot in the head last June, Aaron struggled with weakness and balance on the left side of his body. He spent months in physical therapy before being discharged in February. Stephanie Colombini/WUSF hide caption

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Stephanie Colombini/WUSF

Guns are killing more U.S. children. Shooting survivors can face lifelong challenges

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In Alua Arthur's 2023 TED Talk, she said her ideal death would happen at sunset. Yeofi Andoh/HarperCollins hide caption

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Yeofi Andoh/HarperCollins

Death doula says life is more meaningful if you 'get real' about the end

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Winston Hall, 9, needs growth hormone to manage symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic condition. A shortage of the medicine has contributed to behavioral issues that led him to be sent home from school. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

Persistent shortage of growth hormone frustrates parents and clinicians

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Bernard Chiira founded the Assistive Technologies for Disability Trust or AT4D. It is an accelerator that has supported 45 startups from 11 countries. Many of the startups aim to help people with disabilities access the technologies they need – including wheelchairs. Gabrielle Emanuel/NPR hide caption

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Gabrielle Emanuel/NPR

Medicare enrollees with two or more chronic conditions are eligible for Chronic Care Management, which pays doctors to check in with those patients monthly. But the service hasn't caught on. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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An EMT wearing personal protective equipment prepares to unload COVID-19 transfer patients in the early days of the pandemic. The Biden Administration has just announced a new program aimed at preventing the next pandemic. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The safety rules being announced and finalized today will hold mines to the same standard for silica dust exposure as other employers. These x-rays show black lung disease. Elaine McMillion Sheldon for PBS Frontline hide caption

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Elaine McMillion Sheldon for PBS Frontline

President Biden greets China's President President Xi Jinping Nov. 15, 2023, in California. China has agreed to curtail shipments of the chemicals used to make fentanyl, the drug at the heart of the U.S. overdose epidemic. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

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Doug Mills/AP

Report: China continues to subsidize deadly fentanyl exports

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