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Farida Mercedes and her two sons Sebastian, 5, (left) and Lucas, 7, stand in their backyard in Fairlawn, N.J. Mercedes left her job as an assistant VP of HR at L'Oreal in August after working there for 17 years. As hundreds of thousands of women dropped out of the workforce in September, Latinas led the way, leaving at nearly three times the rate of white women. Erica Seryhm Lee for NPR hide caption

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Erica Seryhm Lee for NPR

'My Family Needs Me': Latinas Drop Out Of Workforce At Alarming Rates

Women are leaving the workforce at four times the rate of men. The shift is especially pronounced among Latina women, and that could have lasting effects for the broader economy.

'My Family Needs Me': Latinas Drop Out Of Workforce At Alarming Rates

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J.Stone / Imazins/Getty Images/ImaZinS RF

'Dude, I'm Done': When Politics Tears Families And Friendships Apart

During a bruising political season, many Americans are dropping friends and family members who have different political views. Experts say we should be talking more, not less.

'Dude, I'm Done': When Politics Tears Families And Friendships Apart

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Keith Raniere was sentenced on Tuesday to 120 years in prison for his role as ringleader of the NXIVM cult, where he sexually abused several young women. In this June 2019 courtroom artist's sketch, Raniere, center, sits with his attorneys during closing arguments at federal court in Brooklyn, N.Y. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

NXIVM Cult Leader Sentenced To 120 Years In Prison

Keith Raniere, 60, was convicted last year of sex trafficking, human trafficking and racketeering for his role as the head of the cult. "He robbed me of my youth,'' a victim recounted on Tuesday.

Police officers stand guard in Philadelphia following protests over the police shooting death of Walter Wallace on Tuesday. David Delgado/Reuters hide caption

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David Delgado/Reuters

Fatal Police Shooting In Philadelphia Sparks A Second Night Of Protests

Police shot and killed Walter Wallace, a 27-year-old Black man, in a confrontation Monday. National Guard troops will be deployed, at the county's request, amid protests following the shooting.

Increasingly, many people in the U.S., like these teens in a Miami grocery story in August, now routinely wear face masks in public to help stop COVID-19's spread. But social distancing and other public health measures have been slower to catch on, especially among young adults, a national survey finds. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Mask-Wearing Is Up In The U.S., But Young People Are Still Too Lax, CDC Survey Finds

A general increase in mask-wearing has been encouraging, U.S. public health experts say. But too few young people, especially, are social distancing and taking other steps to slow coronavirus' spread.

LA Johnson/NPR

The Science Behind Worry — And How To Calm Your Nerves

Between the coronavirus and the election, the news is overwhelming right now. Neuroscientist Judson Brewer can help. Take a break from the headlines and press play.

When The Headlines Won't Stop, Here's How To Cope With Anxiety

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E. Jean Carroll, left, who says President Donald Trump raped her in the 1990s, leaves the United States Courthouse following a hearing in her defamation lawsuit Oct. 21 in New York. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

E. Jean Carroll Suit Against Trump To Proceed After Judge Rules Against DOJ

A federal judge says the government may not substitute itself for President Trump as the defendant in the matter and accordingly neutralize the case. So the suit against the president can proceed.

Pollution is a global problem. Above: Stockton Street in the Chinatown district of San Francisco on Sept. 9, a time when air quality was affected by wind and wildfires. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

New Study Points To Invisible Killer Of Infants

The culprit is air pollution — a problem around the globe, from homes where people cook using coal and wood to the smoky streets of San Francisco when wildfires were raging.

A woman walks past a wrecked van near the northwestern Syrian village of Barisha. Local residents and medical staff told NPR that noncombatant civilians who were in the van were injured and killed last year the night of the U.S. raid on the compound of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The military says the men were "combatants" but found no weapons. Ibrahim Yasouf/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ibrahim Yasouf/AFP via Getty Images

Pentagon Says 2 Men Killed In Baghdadi Raid Were Combatants But Offers Little Proof

After NPR reported claims of civilian deaths in the operation against ISIS' chief, Central Command says the men showed "hostile intent" but it found no weapons nor signs they fired at U.S. forces.

Pentagon Says 2 Men Killed In Baghdadi Raid Were Combatants But Offers Little Evidence

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Anti-abortion-rights activists participate in the March for Life rally near the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 24. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

A World Without Legal Abortion: How Activists Envision A 'Post-Roe' Nation

With the confirmation of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, anti-abortion activists hope for a world where ending an unwanted pregnancy is not an option.

A World Without Legal Abortion: How Activists Envision A 'Post-Roe' Nation

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USAID is one of the largest official foreign aid organizations in the world. An executive order from the Trump administration said there would be consequences if its diversity training programs were to continue. Photo Illustration by Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Why Diversity Training Has Been Suspended At USAID

The suspension followed an executive order from the Trump administration that called such workplace programs "divisive," "anti-American," racist against white people and sexist against men.

New videos from Kazakhstan's tourism board turn the fictional journalist Borat's catchphrase "Very nice!" into a slogan to promote the Central Asian country. Kazakhstan Travel / Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Kazakhstan Travel / Screenshot by NPR

'Very Nice!': Kazakhstan, Outraged No More, Embraces Borat In New Slogan

The country is welcoming a chance to boost its profile through the new movie featuring the fictional journalist Borat. And as one young Kazakhstani puts it, "This is a parody of American society."

When Tiffany Qiu found herself on the hook for her usual 30% Blue Shield of California coinsurance after the hospital quoted 20%, she pushed back. Shelby Knowles for KHN hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for KHN

Hit With An Unexpectedly High Medical Bill, Here's How A Savvy Patient Fought Back

Kaiser Health News

When the hospital tried to bill her for more than what she'd been quoted, Tiffany Qiu refused to pay the extra amount and the bill went to collections. She still didn't back down.

Hit With An Unexpectedly High Medical Bill, Here's How A Savvy Patient Fought Back

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Marc Polymeropoulos, a senior CIA official, photographed in Moscow's Red Square in 2017. He fell ill on that trip and has since suffered debilitating migraine headaches that led him to resign from the agency. U.S. diplomats in Cuba and China have suffered similar symptoms in recent years, but the cause has not been identified. Courtesy of Marc Polymeropoulos hide caption

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Courtesy of Marc Polymeropoulos

A CIA Officer Visits Moscow, Returns With Mysterious, Crippling Headaches

Dozens of U.S. diplomats in Cuba and China have complained of chronic, unexplained ailments. Now an ex-CIA official says he had to retire after a trip to Russia led to debilitating migraines.

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