NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

More NPR content after sponsor message

Bullhorns are seen during a demonstration in front of the Supreme Court on June 29. The court had a momentous term with cases ranging from President Trump's financial records to immigration and abortion. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

A Powerful Chief And Unexpected Splits: 6 Takeaways From The Supreme Court Term

From abortion to religion and immigration, the recent court term featured just about every flashpoint in American law. Here are the highlights, including the influence of Chief Justice John Roberts.

A Powerful Chief And Unexpected Splits: 6 Takeaways From The Supreme Court Term

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889785185/889974727" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lin-Manuel Miranda, composer and creator of the award-winning Broadway musical, Hamilton. History's Alexander Hamilton was at the center of the push to create an Electoral College. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Giusti/AP

Hamilton, In Fiction And History, Is Key To Understanding The Electoral College

When the Supreme Court ruled this past week on "faithless electors," Alexander Hamilton's name appeared five times. But the story is a little more complicated than that told by the Broadway show.

Thomas Salts spent two weeks recovering from COVID-19 in a hotel in Phoenix, Ariz. Circle the City, a Phoenix-based nonprofit, is helping Salts and other people experiencing homelessness gain access to health care. Thomas Salts hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Salts

A Phoenix Nonprofit Opens Up A Hotel To Homeless Coronavirus Patients

Scott Simon speaks with Thomas Salts, one of the COVID-19 patients treated and cared for in a Phoenix hotel by Circle the City, a group providing care and services to people experiencing homelessness.

A Phoenix Nonprofit Opens Up A Hotel To Homeless Coronavirus Patients

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/890000877/890000878" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thomas Chatterton Williams, along with more than 150 journalists, authors and writers, published a letter decrying the "intolerant climate that has set in on all sides" of debate in Harper's Magazine. Thomas Chatterton Williams hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Chatterton Williams

Thomas Chatterton Williams On Debate, Criticism And The Letter In 'Harper's Magazine'

A letter on the importance of open debate was published by Harper's Magazine this week and was signed by more than 150 prominent writers and thinkers, fueling a controversy over debate and privilege.

Thomas Chatterton Williams On Debate, Criticism And The Letter In 'Harper's Magazine'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/890052755/890078880" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Cinderella's Castle rises above Bay Lake at the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World on Saturday. Disney reopened two of its Florida parks after nearly four months of being closed due to the pandemic. Gregg Newton/AFP via Getty Image hide caption

toggle caption
Gregg Newton/AFP via Getty Image

Masks And Mouse Ears: Disney World Reopens As Coronavirus Cases Climb In Florida

After 117 days being closed, Disney World welcomed guests back to its Magic Kingdom and Animal Kingdom parks. Masks and temperature checks were required, as well as advance reservations.

Fans sit in the stands before the start of a game between the New York Giants and Washington Redskins at FedEx Field in 2019 in Landover, Md. The Redskins, and other teams, are reviewing their names. Patrick McDermott/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick McDermott/Getty Images

The Racial Justice Reckoning Over Sports Team Names Is Spreading

KCUR 89.3

In the wake of George Floyd's killing, Confederate monuments have fallen, food companies have scrubbed racist imagery from labels, and now, pro sports teams names are under fresh review.

The Racial Justice Reckoning Over Sports Team Names Is Spreading

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889874026/889929596" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Loading...

A pedestrian walks past anti-5G graffiti in the Flatiron district of New York in May. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noam Galai/Getty Images

The Anatomy Of A COVID-19 Conspiracy Theory

Conspiracy theories need the right ingredients to take off, and the coronavirus pandemic has been a breeding ground for them. Here's how fear, wealth and social media all play a role.

Anatomy Of A COVID-19 Conspiracy Theory

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889037310/889842785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A 1-month-old baby mandrill clings onto its mother Jinx, at the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans on July 6. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerald Herbert/AP

What Lobsters And Ants Can Teach Us About Social Distancing

Researchers have reported that some animals take precautions and keep their distance so they're less likely to be infected by another animal. Scott Simon wonders why some humans won't do the same.

Opinion: What Lobsters And Ants Can Teach Us About Social Distancing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889935936/890000891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man wearing military fatigues stands next to the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines MH17 carrying 298 passengers and crew, that crashed in eastern Ukraine six years ago. Dominique Faget/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dominique Faget/AFP via Getty Images

Nearly 6 Years After MH17 Was Shot Down, Dutch Prosecutors Say They Will Sue Russia

Russia has denied any involvement in the 2014 crash of the Malaysian jetliner that killed nearly 300 people. Investigators say it was hit by a Russian-supplied surface-to-air missile.

caption tktk tktk hide caption

toggle caption
tktk

'Who Does This To A Kid?' D.C. Family Mourns 11-Year-Old Killed By Crossfire

Davon McNeal was one of several children killed by gun violence over the July Fourth weekend while doing everyday things: playing in the yard, walking through a mall, watching fireworks.

'Who Does This To A Kid?' D.C. Family Mourns 11-Year-Old Killed By Crossfire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889711262/889842803" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Random House

'Utopia Avenue,' The Greatest '60s Band That Never Was

David Mitchell's new novel chronicles the rise and fall of fictional 1960s psychedelic rock band. He says he was drawn to both the music and the "dark magic that was in the air" in that era.

'Utopia Avenue,' The Greatest Sixties Band That Never Was

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889862161/890000897" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An employee sews a miniature dress in Dior's sewing workshop in Paris on July 4. This year Dior created a miniature collection for its haute couture show and presented it as a film. Francois Guillot/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Francois Guillot/AFP via Getty Images

You May Be In Sweatpants, But COVID-19 Hasn't Stopped Haute Couture

In a fashion first, this season's collections were presented digitally, rather than in-person, in-Paris. The virtual venue was an opportunity for designers to experiment in the online space.

Rachel Murray/Getty Images for MAKERS

How A Math-Loving Executive Used Hotmail And A Spreadsheet To Find Winning Scripts

In 2005, an anonymous list of the best unmade scripts shook up the industry. And, along the way, it may just have reinvented Hollywood's power structure.

Hollywood's Black List

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889708583/889889732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A field trip to the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., led by Kimberly Grayson, the principal of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Early College in Denver, inspired some of her students to demand a more inclusive school curriculum. Chemetra Keys hide caption

toggle caption
Chemetra Keys

Denver School Principal On How Black Students Led Swift Changes To History Curriculum

Kimberly Grayson took her high schoolers to the African American history museum in D.C. When students pressed their white teachers to take the same trip, a revised history curriculum quickly followed.

Denver School Principal On How Black Students Led Swift Changes To History Curriculum

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889743843/889842791" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

Tiny Desk carousel

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

more from