NPR - Breaking News, Analysis, Music, Arts & Podcasts Top stories in the U.S. and world news, politics, health, science, business, music, arts and culture. Nonprofit journalism with a mission. This is NPR.

Facebook parent Meta appears to be more concerned with avoiding "provoking" VIPs than balancing tricky questions of free speech and safety, its oversight board said. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook's own oversight board slams its special program for VIPs

Oversight board says Facebook parent Meta appears to be more concerned with avoiding "provoking" VIPs and evading accusations of censorship than balancing tricky questions of free speech and safety.

Herschel Walker, the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate for Georgia, left, and Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate Sen. Raphael Warnock. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Brynn Anderson/AP

Walker and Warnock make final pitches to Georgia voters in their U.S. Senate runoff

Georgia Public Broadcasting

It's been a four-week sprint by both campaigns to get Georgia voters to show up and cast ballots before polls close today. Warnock has targeted college students, Black voters and moderates, while Walker doubled down on cultural issues that play to the GOP base.

Oleh Mahlay, the artistic director of the Bandurist Choir, conducts members of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus of North America and Ukrainian Children's Choir at New York City's Carnegie Hall on Sunday. Fadi Kheir hide caption

toggle caption
Fadi Kheir

Ukrainians sing 'Carol of the Bells' at Carnegie Hall, 100 years after its U.S. debut

A Ukrainian chorus first performed Shchedryk in the U.S. in 1922. A century later, during another fight for freedom, Ukranian singers performed the folk song at the site of its North American debut.

As a prospective college student, McKenna Hensley had to wade through confusing and hard-to-compare financial aid letters, trying to understand which college she could afford. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

College aid letters are misleading students and need a legal fix

New federal research says colleges mislead students with confusing financial aid letters. The consequences can run from extra debt to quitting school.

College aid letters are misleading students and need a legal fix

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140807450/1140807451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mary O'Connor, pictured here addressing reporters during a news conference at Tampa Police headquarters in February, resigned after using her position to escape a ticket during a traffic stop. Dirk Shadd/Tampa Bay Times via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dirk Shadd/Tampa Bay Times via AP

Tampa police chief resigns after she flashed her badge to escape a traffic stop

Body camera footage showed Police Chief Mary O'Connor saying "I'm hoping you'll just let us go tonight" after a deputy pulled her and her husband over for driving an unregistered golf cart.

Technicians from DTEK, Ukraine's largest private energy company, work to replace a cable at a substation in the Teremky neighborhood of Kyiv on Wednesday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Pete Kiehart for NPR

In an ongoing race, Ukraine tries to repair faster than Russia bombs

Ukraine's electrical grid has been under assault from Russian airstrikes for two months. Repair workers are racing to fix damaged power stations, even as the country braces for more attacks.

In an ongoing race, Ukraine tries to repair faster than Russia bombs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140527715/1140894482" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The central business district skyline is seen during the dusk in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, April 29, 2019. Indonesia's Parliament has passed a long-awaited and controversial revision of its penal code, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022, that criminalizes extramarital sex and applies to citizens and visiting foreigners alike. Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dita Alangkara/AP

Indonesia criminalizes adultery, but the law may take up to 3 years to take effect

Indonesia's penal code had languished for decades while legislators in the world's biggest Muslim-majority nation struggled with how to adapt its native culture and norms to the criminal code.

Boxer Legnis Cala, center, talks with fellow female boxers during a training session in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Dec. 5, 2022. Cuban officials announced on Monday that women boxers would be able to compete for the first time ever. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ramon Espinosa/AP

Boxing powerhouse Cuba lets women boxers compete

Cuban officials say women boxers will be able to compete officially after decades of restrictions, though they didn't yet confirm if that would be taken to a professional level like Cuban male boxers.

Mourners gather outside Club Q to visit a memorial, which has been moved from a sidewalk outside of police tape that was surrounding the club, on Friday, Nov. 25, 2022, in Colorado Spring, Colo. Parker Seibold/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Parker Seibold/AP

Colorado LGBTQ club shooting suspect set to return to court

The suspect accused of entering a Colorado LGBTQ nightclub, opening fire and killing five people and wounding 17 others is set to appear in court Tuesday to learn what charges prosecutors will pursue.

Lorie Smith, the owner of 303 Creative, a website design company in Colorado, speaks Monday to reporters outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

The Supreme Court hears the case of web designer who doesn't want to work on same-sex weddings

Lorie Smith says Colorado's public accommodations laws violate her right of free speech.

Supreme Court hears case of web designer who doesn't want to work on same-sex weddings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140824371/1140847279" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

U.S. Capitol Police Chief J. Thomas Manger will speak on behalf of his department at a Congressional Gold Medal ceremony for his officers who defended the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pool/Getty Images

The security failures from Jan. 6 are largely fixed, the Capitol's police chief says

USCP Chief Tom Manger says problems that led to the Capitol riot have been addressed, and he is focusing on expanding field offices to be better prepared for rising threats to congressional members.

Capitol Police chief: Jan. 6 failures 'largely' fixed but extremism threat persists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140753568/1140894464" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A display at the Computer Game Museum in Berlin, Germany features a standing console of Pong, one of the earliest commercially successful video games. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Reflecting on Pong's video game success, 50 years later

50 years ago, Atari released the original Pong as an arcade game. To mark the anniversary, Atari co-founder and Pong designer Allan Alcorn spoke with NPR to reflect on the game's development.

Reflecting on Pong's video game success, 50 years later

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140737453/1140741799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A cosplayer dressed as the Green Goblin poses for a photograph on arrival to attend the MCM Comic Con at ExCeL exhibition centre in London on October 28, 2022. Isabel Infantes /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Isabel Infantes /AFP via Getty Images

How 'goblin mode' became Oxford's word of the year

The slang term means "behavior which is unapologetically self-indulgent, lazy, slovenly, or greedy, typically in a way that rejects social norms." It was the landslide pick in a public vote.

Karl Goldstein nearly gave up playing the piano, but then a word of encouragement from a tough teacher put him on a lifelong career path. Karl Goldstein hide caption

toggle caption
Karl Goldstein

A few words of encouragement from his music teacher changed Karl Goldstein's life

Karl Goldstein nearly gave up playing the piano, but a few words from a tough music teacher put him on a lifelong path in music.

A few words of encouragement from his music teacher changed Karl Goldstein's life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140759435/1140807524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
more from