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Katie Couric appears at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party on March 27 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Couric said Wednesday that she'd been diagnosed with breast cancer, and underwent surgery and radiation treatment this summer to treat the tumor. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Katie Couric says she's been treated for breast cancer

The TV news host, who memorably was tested for colon cancer on the Today show, wrote on her website that she's had surgery and radiation treatment. "Please get your annual mammogram," she said.

Aerial view of downtown Fort Worth, Texas. Some hospitals in Texas and around the U.S. are seeing high profits, even as their bills force patients into debt. Of the nation's 20 most populous counties, none has a higher concentration of medical debt than Tarrant County, home to Fort Worth. Jupiterimages/Getty Images hide caption

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Jupiterimages/Getty Images

Some hospitals rake in high profits while their patients are loaded with medical debt

Kaiser Health News

Across the U.S., many hospitals have become wealthy, even as their bills force patients to make gut-wrenching sacrifices. This pattern is especially stark for health care systems in Dallas-Fort Worth.

Instead of going back to a corporate job, Farida Mercedes started her own business. It pays less, but she has more flexibility to spend time with her sons Sebastian (left) and Lucas, ages 7 and 9. Farida Mercedes hide caption

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Farida Mercedes

Women are returning to (paid) work after the pandemic forced many to leave their jobs

The number of women in the workforce has finally returned to pre-pandemic levels, which is good for the economy. But after time away from the job market some women are reassessing their priorities.

Women are returning to (paid) work after the pandemic forced many to leave their jobs

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Brittney Griner waits for the verdict during a hearing outside Moscow on Aug. 4. The WNBA star is one of more than five dozen Americans being held hostage or wrongfully detained abroad, according to the James. W. Foley Legacy Foundation. Evgenia Novozhenina/Pool photo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Evgenia Novozhenina/Pool photo/AFP via Getty Images

Wrongful detentions of Americans by foreign powers are fast rising, a new study says

The report finds a dramatic rise in the number of Americans who are being wrongfully held, as a growing number of countries embrace the practice as a way to gain leverage over the U.S.

Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-IN) sits between Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) and Sen. Todd Young (R-IN) during a meeting between President Donald Trump and congressional members on Feb. 13, 2018. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Biden calls out for late Rep. Jackie Walorski at White House hunger event

Biden mistakenly called out for the Indiana Republican who died in a car crash in August. She had cosponsored a bill to fund the conference. The White House has not responded to a request for comment.

Bed Bath & Beyond is working on yet another turnaround after a series of crises and missteps. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Will Bed Bath & Beyond sink like Sears or rise like Best Buy?

The company has been on a rollercoaster of crises, including a meme-stock rise and crash. Its latest financial report comes Thursday.

Will Bed Bath & Beyond sink like Sears or rise like Best Buy?

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This is the last complete image of Dimorphos taken by the DRACO imager on NASA's DART mission before the collision. It shows a patch of the asteroid about 100 feet across, captured from some seven miles away and two seconds before impact. NASA/Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins APL

This is what NASA's spacecraft saw just seconds before slamming into an asteroid

NASA successfully crashed a spacecraft into an asteroid on Monday night. These are the final images it captured as it hurtled toward the rocky surface.

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says the Biden administration has plans to help the economy absorb supply shocks. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Why tackling climate change means a stronger economy — according to Janet Yellen

Yellen says the Biden administration is emphasizing action on climate change to make a more resilient American economy. What does that look like for the future of infrastructure and spending?

Why tackling climate change means a stronger economy — according to Janet Yellen

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Oregon Shakespeare Festival Artistic Director Nataki Garrett stands inside the Allen Elizabethan Theatre in Ashland, Ore. She recently programmed her first full season but not everyone has embraced her new approach. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Oregon Shakespeare Festival focuses on expansion — but is not without its critics

After two years of pandemic closures, audiences are back at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, to find a season of diverse plays. But for many, change has come too soon.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival focuses on expansion – but is not without its critics

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Hilaree Nelson of Telluride, Colorado, left and James Morrison of Tahoe, California, raise their fists as the pair arrived in Kathmandu, Nepal, in 2018. Rescuers in a helicopter were searching on the world's eighth-highest mountain Tuesday for Nelson, the famed U.S. ski mountaineer, a day after her trip organizer said she fell off the mountain near the peak. Niranjan Shrestha/AP hide caption

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Niranjan Shrestha/AP

Rescuers in Nepal are searching for a famed U.S. ski climber

Hilaree Nelson, 49, was skiing down from the 26,775-foot summit with her partner Jim Morrison when she fell off the mountain, according to the company that organized the expedition.

A Nissan electric vehicle recharges at a Power Up fast charger station on April 14, 2022, in Pasadena, Calif. California has more chargers than any other state in the U.S., but the federal government is trying to expand charger access across the country. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Federal money is now headed to states for building up fast EV chargers on highways

All 50 states, D.C. and Puerto Rico have received the go-ahead to start spending federal dollars on new chargers. The long-term plan is to spend $5 billion improving charging infrastructure.

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