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A truck leaves the highway at the Hefner Road exit of I-35 in Oklahoma City on March 20. Truckers say that the impact from the coronavirus is twofold: Some have more loads now because of shortages, while others say that their customers are not ordering and have cut their runs down. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP
Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Episode 984: Food And Farmworkers

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Freitag says her corn salad — from her book, The Chef Next Door — is a simple dish prepared with mostly pantry items. Courtesy of David Malosh hide caption

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Courtesy of David Malosh

Need Help Cooking Through The Coronavirus Pandemic? Chef Amanda Freitag Has Tips

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Ecco

In 'Wine Girl,' Taking On The Old Boys Of The Wine World

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Owner Steve Johnson attaches a notice on the door of Keegan's Grill in Phoenix notifying guests his restaurant will close. Rapid shutdowns have delivered a blow to restaurants around the country. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Closed All At Once: Restaurant Industry Faces Collapse

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Franklin Pierce Schools bus driver Margie Huggler hands out free meals to students in Tacoma, Wash. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Schools Race To Feed Students Amid Coronavirus Closures

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Nonperishable goods, paper products and soap have been flying off shelves at American stores. Snacks and produce are selling more, too. Sunscreen? Not so much. Maxwell Posner/NPR hide caption

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Maxwell Posner/NPR

A person shops in front of the empty shelves in the deli section of a Walmart Supercenter in Nashville on Saturday. Jason Kempin/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Kempin/Getty Images

Empty Grocery Shelves Are Alarming, But They're Not Permanent

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Workers pick apples in a Wapato, Wash., orchard last October. U.S. farms employ hundreds of thousands of seasonal workers, mostly from Mexico, who enter the country on H-2A visas. The potential impact of the coronavirus on seasonal workers has the food industry on edge. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

COVID-19 Threatens Food Supply Chain As Farms Worry About Workers Falling Ill

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Shoppers found some empty shelves at a Kroger grocery store in Grosse Ile, Mich., on Friday. Americans are stocking up on food, toilet paper, water and other items amid the coronavirus outbreak. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images hide caption

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Critics had called on the Department of Agriculture to suspend implementation of the new food stamp restrictions, especially in light of the economic crisis spurred by the coronavirus pandemic. Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Soybean plants grow in a field near Tiskilwa, Ill. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An Airbnb For Farmland Hits A Snag, As Farmers Raise Data Privacy Concerns

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Hiroki Koga, co-founder of the Oishii Farm in New Jersey, cultivated the Omakase berry, which is distinguished by its strong aroma and sweetness. He says he was unimpressed with the quality of produce in the U.S. Courtesy of Oishii hide caption

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Courtesy of Oishii
Jianan Liu for NPR

Food Fight: How 2 Trump Proposals Could Bite Into School Lunch

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Stir-fried mantou buns with cumin and chili. Food bloggers Stephanie Li and Christopher Thomas have eaten the small steamed bread often while on lockdown during the coronavirus outbreak. They had been working on a recipe for the buns before the virus hit, so they had a large supply of the ingredients. "Wanted a new way to finish it up, so stir frying it is," they wrote on their food blog. Stephanie Li and Christopher Thomas/Chinese Cooking Demystified hide caption

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Stephanie Li and Christopher Thomas/Chinese Cooking Demystified

In China, Quarantine Challenges Cooks To Get Clever

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