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A helicopter puts out a fire at the scene of an explosion at the port of Lebanon's capital Beirut on Aug. 4. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

After Beirut, Experts Warn Of 'Dangerous Gaps' In U.S. Oversight Of Ammonium Nitrate

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Black leaders say a prayer with President Trump as they end a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House on Feb. 27, 2020. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

A local gospel quintet entertains Sterling residents on a recent Tuesday evening. Frank Morris hide caption

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Frank Morris

Former Vice President Joe Biden has significant support from Black voters, young voters, whites with a college degree and suburban voters. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Poll: Biden Expands Lead, A Third Of Country Says It Won't Get Vaccinated

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

13 States Make Contact Tracing Data Public. Here's What They're Learning

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Barack Obama, then a little known state senator and candidate for U.S. Senate from Illinois, speaks during the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston. Laura Rauch/AP hide caption

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Laura Rauch/AP

Political Conventions Will Likely Never Be The Same

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Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is calling on Americans to do their part to contain the coronavirus as flu season comes into view. Kevin Dietsch/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, pictured last month, withdrew litigation against Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and the City Council over a requirement to wear masks in public and other restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Tribune Publishing is closing several of its newsrooms, including the one at New York's Daily News, as the pandemic forces journalists to work remotely. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Two years after opening an investigation into Yale University's use of race in admissions, the Justice Department is demanding that the school agree not to use race or national origin in its upcoming 2020-2021 admissions cycle. Beth J. Harpaz/AP hide caption

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Beth J. Harpaz/AP

Belvin Jefferson White poses with a portrait of her father, Saymon Jefferson, who died from COVID-19, in Baton Rouge, La., in May. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

A group solicits funds for weapons by asking for bitcoin, according to the Department of Justice. The Trump administration says al-Qaida and affiliated groups have used such donations to fund terrorism. Department of Justice hide caption

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Department of Justice

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks Thursday after a coronavirus briefing with health experts and his newly named running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris, at the Hotel DuPont in Wilmington, Del. Biden took off his mask to speak. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A voter places a ballot in a secure box in Providence, R.I., in June for the state's presidential primary. The U.S. Supreme Court says the state can suspend its witness or notary requirement to vote by mail in the fall elections. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Going to stay with family means exposing more than one household. Can testing in advance keep everyone safe? Noel Hendrickson/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Hendrickson/Getty Images

Gray reef sharks hang out together in French Polynesia. Bernard Radvaner/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernard Radvaner/Corbis/Getty Images

Everyone Needs A Buddy. Even Sharks

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Emergency medical technician Breonna Taylor, 26, was shot and killed by police in her home in March. Her name and those of others have become rallying cries in protests against police brutality and social injustice. Taylor Family hide caption

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Taylor Family