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As Many Parents Fret Over Remote Learning, Some Find Their Kids Are Thriving

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South Korean Military take part in a drill near the Korean Demilitarized Zone in Paju, South Korea, June 18, 2020. Seung-il Ryu/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Seung-il Ryu/NurPhoto via Getty Images

President Biden and Vice President Harris invited 10 labor leaders into the Oval Office in mid-February. Biden has pledged to be the most labor-friendly president ever. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Faces 'Balancing Act' Advancing Clean Energy Alongside Labor Allies

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On Sunday, New York state Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins called on Gov. Andrew Cuomo to resign amid sexual harassment allegations from multiple women. Office of the New York Governor via AP hide caption

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Office of the New York Governor via AP

Allan McDonald in 2016 with a commemorative poster honoring the seven astronauts killed aboard the space shuttle Challenger, and McDonald's attempt to postpone the launch. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Howard Berkes/NPR

Remembering Allan McDonald: He Refused To Approve Challenger Launch, Exposed Cover-Up

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The archbishop of Mosul, Najib Mikhael Moussa (left) waves as he stands next to Pope Francis at the start of a gathering to pray for the victims of war at the Hosh al-Bieaa Church Square, in Mosul, Iraq, once the de facto capital of ISIS on Sunday. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

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Andrew Medichini/AP

Edith Arangoitia receives a COVID-19 vaccination in Chelsea, Mass., a heavily Hispanic community, on Feb. 16. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Misinformation And Mistrust Among The Obstacles Latinos Face In Getting Vaccinated

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A cuttlefish swims in an aquarium at the Scientific Center of Kuwait in 2016. Cuttlefish showed impressive self-control in an adaptation of the classic "marshmallow test." Yasser Al-Zayyat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasser Al-Zayyat/AFP via Getty Images

Why Cuttlefish Are Smarter Than We Thought

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A crowd watches two people dressed in rat and flea costumes to illustrate the creatures that spread bubonic plague, which took millions of lives in India in the early 20th century. The photo was taken on Jan. 1, 1910. Hulton Deutsch/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Deutsch/Corbis via Getty Images

A store in New York City stands closed on April 21, 2020. A year after the coronavirus pandemic was declared, millions of Americans are still unemployed. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

'Why Us?': A Year After Being Laid Off, Millions Are Still Unemployed

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President Biden speaks from the State Dining Room of the White House on Saturday, following the Senate's passage of his COVID-19 relief package by a 50-49 vote. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Facebook has promised repeatedly in recent years to address the spread of conspiracy theories and misinformation on its site. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

Far-Right Misinformation Is Thriving On Facebook. A New Study Shows Just How Much

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