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A new study of Deinosuchus or "terror crocodiles," led by Adam Cosette, offers a fuller picture of the ancient creature from head to tail. Cossette said Deinosuchus had large, robust teeth, ranging from six to eight inches long, as shown in the photo. Adam Cossette hide caption

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Adam Cossette

A family photo shows Buddy and 10-month-old Duke this past winter. The puppy, who tested positive for antibodies but never got sick, has been sleeping in all of Buddy's old spots, his owners say. Kholood Eid/National Geographic hide caption

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Kholood Eid/National Geographic

1st U.S. Dog With COVID-19 Has Died, And There's A Lot We Still Don't Know

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Russian President Vladimir Putin announced the approval of Russia's coronavirus vaccine during a government meeting on Tuesday. Alexey Nikolsky/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexey Nikolsky/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images
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At Least 97,000 Children Tested Positive For Coronavirus In Last 2 Weeks Of July

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On the left is an unmodified hatchling of a longfin inshore squid (Doryteuthis pealeii). The one on the right was injected with CRISPR-Cas9 targeting a pigmentation gene before the first cell division. It has very few pigmented cells and lighter eyes. Karen Crawford hide caption

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Karen Crawford

Gene-Altered Squid Could Be The Next Lab Rats

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Parasites play crucial roles in keeping ecosystems healthy, as does this larval trypanorhynch tapeworm, which infects fish. Chelsea Wood hide caption

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Chelsea Wood

Save The Whales. Save The Tigers. Save The Tapeworms?

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A man wearing a protective mask walks next to travelers as they line up to board a boat in Stockholm, Sweden. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images

A nurse holds a COVID-19 vaccine candidate produced by Chinese company Sinovac Biotech at the São Lucas Hospital in Porto Alegre, Brazil, on Aug. 8. Silvio Avila/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Silvio Avila/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 May Never Go Away — With Or Without A Vaccine

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An installation of children's art is set up outside the Capitol on Wednesday. Kids can develop "severe" symptoms from the coronavirus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a report released Friday. Jemal Countess/Getty Images for ParentsTogether hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images for ParentsTogether

For a scientific experiment, a man sits in front of a computer, and an EEG measures the electrical signals released by neurons in his brain. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Micro Wave: Spreading Warm Bread With Socks

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Potential COVID-19 vaccines are kept in a tray at Novavax labs in Maryland on March 20. The Novavax vaccine requires an immune-boosting ingredient called an adjuvant to be effective. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

The Special Sauce That Makes Some Vaccines Work

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Researchers uncover why shaving can cause sharp blades to dull quickly. Gustavo Rezende Dos Santos/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Gustavo Rezende Dos Santos/EyeEm/Getty Images

Cutting-Edge Research Shows How Hair Dulls Razor Blades

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A woman carrying her mask walks past a sign mandating the wearing of face coverings in Palisades Park in Santa Monica on July 25. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Wearing A Mask Could Be Even More Important Than We Thought

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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam speaks during a news conference in Richmond, Va. on June 4. Virginia has rolled out a smartphone app to automatically notify people if they might have been exposed to the coronavirus. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Conner Curran, 9, (right) and his brother Will, 7, at their home in Ridgefield, Conn. The gene therapy treatment that stopped the muscle wasting of Conner's muscular dystrophy two years ago took more than 30 years of research to develop. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

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Kholood Eid for NPR

Scientists in Canada have diagnosed malignant cancer for the first time in a dinosaur, a Centrosaurus apertus from 76 to 77 million years ago. Sergey Krasovskiy/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergey Krasovskiy/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images

New Research Shows Dinosaurs Suffered From Malignant Cancer, Too

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Farmers work during a harvest in Jutland, Denmark. People keep worrying about food shortages. Some economists say the fears actually create their own problems. Nick Brundle Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Brundle Photography/Getty Images

Food Is Growing More Plentiful, So Why Do People Keep Warning Of Shortages?

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