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When the media covers scientific research, not all scientists are equally likely to be mentioned. A new study finds scientists with Asian or African names were 15% less likely to be named in a story. shironosov/Getty Images hide caption

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shironosov/Getty Images

An artistic rendering of a washed-up Ichthyotitan severnensis carcass on the beach. Sergey Krasovskiy hide caption

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Sergey Krasovskiy

An empty room is pictured in a concrete house in Matam, Senegal. Many families don't have electricity nor the means to own a fan or air conditioning to help quell the intense heat at night, temperatures can stay around 35 degree Celsius throughout the night. John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images

Wildfire smoke covered huge swaths of the U.S. in 2023, including places like New York City, where it has historically been uncommon. New research shows the health costs of breathing in wildfire smoke can be high. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images
Connie Hanzhang Jin

COMIC: Our sun was born with thousands of other stars. Where did they all go?

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Selkirkia tsering fossil found in a collection from the Fezouata Formation in Morocco. Javier Ortega Hernández/Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology hide caption

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Javier Ortega Hernández/Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology

Author Cristina Henriquez next to the cover of her new novel, The Great Divide. Brian McConkey/Ecco hide caption

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Brian McConkey/Ecco

The safety rules being announced and finalized today will hold mines to the same standard for silica dust exposure as other employers. These x-rays show black lung disease. Elaine McMillion Sheldon for PBS Frontline hide caption

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Elaine McMillion Sheldon for PBS Frontline
Lily Padula for NPR

Gay people often have older brothers. Why? And does it matter?

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Four voters share their view of the U.S. economy. Courtesy of Arch City Defenders, Winton Machine Company, Bhavesh Patel and the Just One Project hide caption

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Courtesy of Arch City Defenders, Winton Machine Company, Bhavesh Patel and the Just One Project

After using the Lenire device for an hour each day for 12 weeks, Victoria Banks says her tinnitus is "barely noticeable." David Petrelli/Victoria Banks hide caption

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David Petrelli/Victoria Banks

Got tinnitus? A device that tickles the tongue helps this musician find relief

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Here's how the brain experiences pleasure — even the kind that makes us feel guilty

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The author's 8-year-old daughter, Rosy, has a "kids' license," showing she has her parents' permission to ride her bike around her Texas hometown. Michaeleen Doucleff hide caption

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Michaeleen Doucleff

Sisters Sofie Elliott (left) and Simone Elliott say that reconciling their memories felt especially important as they waded into one particular period of their childhood — a darker chapter that they still hadn't fully explored but that they felt ready to confront together. Kayana Szymczak for NPR; Lena Mucha for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR; Lena Mucha for NPR

Sisters make peace with dark memories through art, science and each other

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Scientists Carly Biedul, Coordinator at The Great Salt Lake Institute, Bonnie Baxter, Director at The Great Salt Lake Institute, and Heidi Hoven, Senior Manager at the Gillmor Sanctuary and Audubon Rockies, showed us around a bird sanctuary where many species of birds and insects the the birds feed on are affected by the recession of The Great Salt Lake. Lindsay D'Addato for NPR hide caption

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Lindsay D'Addato for NPR

What biologists see from the shores of the drying Great Salt Lake

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Joel Breman trains scientists in malaria diagnosis in Côte d'Ivoire, 1986. Breman died this month at age 87. Courtesy of the Breman family. hide caption

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Courtesy of the Breman family.

Surgeon Christoph Haller and his research team from Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children are working on technology that could someday result in an artificial womb to help extremely premature babies. Chloe Ellingson for NPR hide caption

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Chloe Ellingson for NPR

An artificial womb could build a bridge to health for premature babies

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Following a new EPA rule, public water systems will have five years to address instances where there is too much PFAS in tap water – three years to sample their systems and establish the existing levels of PFAS, and an additional two years to install water treatment technologies if their levels are too high. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images