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Students Caleb Lam (left), 15, and Kevin Ng, 16, have been taking online classes since the schools shut down. ""You have nothing to do at home after classes. We chat online," Lam says. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

The scientific community has lots of feelings about emoji representation. Geologists are excited about the new rock emoji, for example, but reviews are mixed when it comes to the fly. Emojipedia hide caption

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Emojipedia

Scientists ♥ Their Emojis, But It's Complicated

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An artist's rendering of DNA. Scientists have found traces of DNA that they say is evidence that prehistoric humans procreated with an unknown hominin group in West Africa. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

'Ghost' DNA In West Africans Complicates Story Of Human Origins

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Paul McKay, a molecular immunologist at the Imperial College School of Medicine in London, checks a dish of bacteria containing genetic material from the new coronavirus. He and his team are testing a candidate vaccine. Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images
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Will That Antidepressant Work For You? The Answer May Lie In Your Brain Waves

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Michael Pollan gave up caffeine entirely for three months while working on his audiobook, Caffeine. "I recommend it," he says of his time without the drug. "I had some great sleeps." But he didn't realize that a temporary "loss of confidence" and lack of focus were withdrawal symptoms. Abdulrhman Al Shidokhi/Getty Images hide caption

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Abdulrhman Al Shidokhi/Getty Images

Michael Pollan Explains Caffeine Cravings (And Why You Don't Have To Quit)

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Your body needs trace amounts of zinc for cell division and other basic biology. Nobody's sure how it works to shorten colds. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Bushfires followed by intense rain can cause unsettled sediment and debris to contaminate local water reservoirs. Melbourne's water authority invested in catchments to combat this threat, though scientists are still trying to understand when and how these debris flows occur. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A spoonful of honey makes the medicine...irrelevant. That's because honey works better than cough syrups to help with kids' coughs. But don't give honey to infants under one years old. Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm

For Kid's Coughs, Swap The Over-The-Counter Syrups For Honey

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Solar Orbiter, seen in this artistic rendering, is a collaboration between the European Space Agency and NASA to study the sun and what drives the solar wind that creates space weather that affects Earth. ESA/ATG medialab hide caption

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ESA/ATG medialab

Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander, walks toward the Lunar Roving Vehicle during NASA's sixth and final Apollo lunar landing mission in December 1972. Harrison H. Schmitt/Courtesy of NASA hide caption

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Harrison H. Schmitt/Courtesy of NASA

A Moon Landing In 2024? NASA Says It'll Happen; Others Say: No Way

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Passengers wear protective face masks as they arrive from Shenzhen to Hong Kong at Lo Wu MTR station, hours before the closing of the Lo Wu border crossing in Hong Kong, on February 3, 2020. Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

Methuselah, the first date palm tree grown from ancient seeds, in a photo taken in 2008. Guy Eisner hide caption

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Guy Eisner

Dates Like Jesus Ate? Scientists Revive Ancient Trees From 2,000-Year-Old Seeds

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Chopped and frozen samples of damaged soybean plants are kept in storage at the Office of the Indiana State Chemist. Many contain residues of the herbicide dicamba. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed By Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA For Help

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Sampson wears personal protective equipment in the lab, like these googles, which are also worn by canine law enforcement and military dogs. Doris Dahl/Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign hide caption

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Doris Dahl/Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

A delivery person wears a protective mask and suit as he delivers packages by bicycle on Saturday in Wuhan, China. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Does The New Coronavirus Spread Silently?

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In this satellite image handout from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Hurricane Bill is seen August 19, 2009 in the Atlantic Ocean. Scientists say it generated hundreds of stormquakes along the eastern coast of the United States. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Discovering 'Stormquakes'

Seismologist Wenyuan Fan explains the accidental discovery — buried deep in seismic and meteorological data — that certain storms over ocean water can cause measurable seismic activity, or 'stormquakes.' He says this phenomenon could help scientists better understand the earth below the sea.

Discovering 'Stormquakes'

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This image from an electron microscope shows a cross-sectional view of an oligodendrocyte (blue) among nerve fibers coated with myelin (dark red). In models of autism spectrum disorder, oligodendrocytes appear to create too much or too little myelin. Jose Luis Calvo/Science Source hide caption

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Jose Luis Calvo/Science Source

Researchers Link Autism To A System That Insulates Brain Wiring

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"It's not going to be transported on a box," Dr. Michael Ison, an infectious disease specialist at Northwestern University, says of your chances of contracting the novel coronavirus from packages shipped from China. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

No, You Won't Catch The New Coronavirus Via Packages Or Mail From China

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