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When $600 Goes Away

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A sign advertises hiring of temporary workers at a Pier 1 store that's going out of business in Coral Gables, Fla. Last week, initial unemployment claims broke a 20-week streak of being above 1 million. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

New Jobless Claims Dip Below 1 Million For 1st Time Since March

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Pump jacks work in a field near Lovington, N.M., in 2015. The Trump administration is lifting an Obama-era rule aimed at limiting emissions of methane, a potent climate-warming gas. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Trump's Methane Rollback That Big Oil Doesn't Want

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Tech companies are under enormous pressure from government officials to prevent their platforms from being used by foreign actors and others to disrupt the 2020 election, as occurred in 2016. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Top Facebook Official: Our Aim Is To Make Lying On The Platform 'More Difficult'

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In the run-up to Airbnb's imminent IPO filing, it has implemented a series of policies to help repair the company's reputation within communities that oppose the constant turnover of strangers in their neighborhoods. Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images

Some Netflix users will be able to watch shows at slower and faster speeds. It's a helpful move for blind and deaf users, advocates say. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Netflix Is Letting Some People Speed Up Playback. That's A Big Deal For Blind Fans

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When Redstone was about 30, he went to work for his father who owned a few drive-in theaters in New England. He eventually turned his father's business, National Amusements, into a national theater chain. John Blanding/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Blanding/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Media Titan Sumner Redstone, Who Made Viacom A Global Empire, Dies At 97

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Employers are supposed to stop withholding the payroll tax on Sept. 1. But companies need guidance from the IRS on exactly who is eligible to have their taxes suspended and how to keep track so those taxes can eventually be repaid. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Payroll Tax Delay To Boost Take-Home Pay, But Don't Spend It Yet

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Coronavirus Comes To Venezuela

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A cashier accepts payment from a customer in Munich in March. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

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Matthias Schrader/AP

Pandemic Or Not, Germans Still Prefer Cash

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Stock trading has become easier and cheaper than ever. But have venues like Robinhood made it too risky for inexperienced investors? Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Turn To Stock Trading During Pandemic, But Some See Trouble For The Young

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Co-hosts Peter Kafka and Rani Molla dive deep into the streaming service in the podcast Land of the Giants. Vox Media hide caption

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Vox Media
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Roller Coaster Economy (Scream Inside Only)

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In a ruling Monday, a California judge said Lyft and Uber have refused to comply with a California law, known as AB5, passed last year that was supposed to make it harder for companies in the state to hire workers as contractors. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

California Judge Orders Uber And Lyft To Consider All Drivers Employees

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Staff at the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores turned off a 30-foot waterfall and collected all the coins visitors had thrown into the water to make wishes. After cleaning the money, they'll put it toward the aquarium's expenses. Liz Baird/Courtesy of North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores hide caption

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Liz Baird/Courtesy of North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores

Aquarium Is Washing Old Wishes To Pay Bills During Pandemic

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