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Economy

President Trump speaks as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (right) and Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council, listen during a news briefing on July 2. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

United Airlines says it plans to furlough up to 36,000 employees as the pandemic continues to batter the travel industry and much of the economy. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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'Devastated': As Layoffs Keep Coming, Hopes Fade That Jobs Will Return Quickly

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Artwork by Therrious Davis Therrious Davis for NPR hide caption

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Therrious Davis for NPR
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Why We Need Black-Owned Banks

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Gov. Jim Justice, W.Va., waves to the crowd at his annual State of the State speech on Jan. 9, 2019, in Charleston, W.Va. Tyler Evert/AP hide caption

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Tyler Evert/AP

Data Raises Questions About Who Benefited From PPP Loans

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A manager of a financial services store in Ballwin, Mo., counts cash being paid to a client as part of a loan in 2018. Consumer groups blasted a new payday lending rule and its timing during a pandemic that has put tens of millions of people out of work. Sid Hastings/AP hide caption

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Sid Hastings/AP

The Boston salon where Vincent Cox works has reopened, and the 65-year-old is back at work. "It's been one of the hardest things I've ever done in my life," he says. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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'Almost In Tears': A Hairstylist Worries About Reopening Too Soon

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Unintended Consequences, Hidden Deaths

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"We don't have a whole lot of options that don't involve risking our lives," says New Orleans resident Lauren Van Netta, who has asthma and other health issues. Lauren Van Netta hide caption

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Lauren Van Netta

'We Need Help': People At Higher Coronavirus Risk Fear Losing Federal Unemployment

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A couple has lunch under plexiglass protection designed by Christophe Gernigon at the H.A.N.D restaurant, on May 27, 2020, in Paris, as France eases lockdown measures taken to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images

Business As Usual During The Pandemic, This Time Through Plexiglass

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A restaurant server in New York prepares a table. But people remain cautious about going out and spending money. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin gestures toward Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell, as they appear before a House Committee on Financial Services hearing on oversight of the Treasury Department and Federal Reserve pandemic response, on Tuesday in Washington. Bill O'Leary/AP hide caption

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Bill O'Leary/AP
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Inflation, Deflation

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The Market For Student Loans

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Grocery shopping the first few weeks of this crisis was insane (and frankly, it's still pretty nuts now). Shelves were empty. People were trying to buy up tons of stuff because no one knew what was going to happen; so demand was way up, but supply was the same. NPR hide caption

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As coronavirus cases persist and some states even backtrack their reopening plans, essential workers have flooded social media with calls for hazard pay. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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When Essential Workers Earn Less Than The Jobless: 'We Put The Country On Our Back'

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Listener Questions: Past Pandemics And Property Prices

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