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Demonstrators face off with the police in front of the White House as they protest against the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis Police. Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images

Protesting In A Pandemic; The Fight Over Mail-In Voting

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Protests over police treatment of black people have sparked concerns about the spread of COVID-19. Here, a protester marches Monday in Philadelphia with a cloth mask saying, "I can't breathe." Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Thousands attend a 2019 candlelight vigil in Hong Kong for victims of the Chinese government's 1989 crackdown on protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. Organizers question why police are blocking the demonstration this year. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

The World Health Organization's Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, here at a press conference earlier this year, gave his reaction Monday to President Trump's declaration about funding the agency. Tedros said he learned of Trump's decision from the president's briefing. Denis Balibouse/Reuters hide caption

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Denis Balibouse/Reuters

Members of the Florida National Guard are seen at a coronavirus testing site on April 27 in North Miami. Restrictions are easing, but officials worry people might now hesitate to evacuate during a hurricane. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Hurricane Season Collides With Pandemic As Communities Plan For Dual Emergencies

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The pandemic and its economic fallout have made it harder for those who experience domestic violence to escape their abuser, say crisis teams, but the National Domestic Violence Hotline is one place to get quick help. Text LOVEIS to 1-866-331-9474 if speaking by phone feels too risky. Roos Koole/Getty Images hide caption

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Roos Koole/Getty Images

Domestic Abuse Can Escalate In Pandemic And Continue Even If You Get Away

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People in cars arrive at a drive-up COVID-19 testing site outside a Rite Aid in Toms River, N.J., on April 22. About 3% of Rite Aid stores are offering testing for the virus. Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Trump's Plan For Drive-Up COVID-19 Tests At Stores Yields Few Results

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Traditional Diné medicine practitioner Jeneda Benally, pictured here with her daughter Dahi, is trying to preserve cultural wisdom in danger of being lost during the pandemic. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Navajo Nation Loses Elders And Tradition To COVID-19

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Top officials with the European Union urged President Trump to rethink his plans to leave the international agency. Trump announced his decision Friday after weeks of levying criticisms and threatening to pull funding. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

A church in North Hollywood, Calif., stands empty last month after services were canceled because of coronavirus restrictions. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Writer and activist Larry Kramer, here in 1989, was an unapologetically loud and irrepressible voice in the fight against AIDS. Sara Krulwich/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara Krulwich/Getty Images

Opinion: Larry Kramer, A Remembrance Of A Fierce AIDS Activist

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Dr. Jonas E. Salk, who discovered the polio vaccine, reads with his wife and three boys in Ann Arbor, Mich., on April 11, 1955. The boys were among the first vaccinated during testing. The family was photographed the night before an announcement the vaccine was effective. Pictured from left are Jonathan, 5; Donna Salk; Peter, 11; Salk; and Darrell, 8. AP hide caption

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AP
Images by Fabio/Getty Images

Motels are closed in late April in Old Orchard Beach, Maine, during measures to stem the spread of the coronavirus. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP