Health Health

Health

June (left) and Mary Kelly with a photo of their mother, Marilyn Kelly. Marilyn was living at Our House Too, in Rutland, Vt., before she died. James Buck/VPR/Seven Days hide caption

toggle caption
James Buck/VPR/Seven Days

A man gets tested for diabetes at an event in Dhaka, Bangladesh, for World Diabetes Day in 2019. Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The WHO Knows Insulin Is Too Expensive. How It Plans To Drive Down The Price

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/803762187/805967205" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Disposable vapes may be hotter than Juul among kids, according to researcher Bonnie Halpern-Felsher. She received a bag of vape pens recently confiscated by a high school principal in northern California, with flavors like Banana Ice and Cool Mint. Bonnie Halpern-Felsher hide caption

toggle caption
Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

Teens Are Still Vaping Flavors, Thanks To New Disposable Vape Pens

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805972087/806599854" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ethan Howard was among 235 people in the southern Indiana community of Austin, Ind., to be infected with HIV in an outbreak that hit in 2015. It was fueled by injection drug use. Luke Sharrett/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Luke Sharrett/Kaiser Health News

Passengers walk along the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, on which about 3,600 people have been quarantined because of fears of the new COVID-19 coronavirus. Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images

A federal appeals court has upheld a ruling that blocked work requirements in Arkansas and in Kentucky, which has since rescinded them. Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar is seen testifying before the Senate Finance Committee on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping attend a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Osaka last June. The two leaders spoke by phone earlier this month. Since the coronavirus outbreak, China has let in some experts from the World Health Organization but has not yet allowed in a team from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

For U.S. And China, Coronavirus Adds Pressure To Relationship Already Under Strain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/806096040/806114947" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A masked Yoda and Pikachu guard a table with signs notifying evacuees of times for daily temperature checks. Chunlin Leonhard hide caption

toggle caption
Chunlin Leonhard

Halfway Through U.S. Quarantines, Two Women Describe 'Surreal,' Lonely Waits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805442461/805760651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A bus departs from the dock where the Diamond Princess cruise ship sits under quarantine with its thousands of passengers and crew. Japanese authorities said Friday that some older passengers who tested negative for the coronavirus were allowed to disembark. Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images

A doctor wearing a face mask looks at a CT image of a lung of a patient at a hospital in Wuhan, China. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images

How COVID-19 Kills: The New Coronavirus Disease Can Take A Deadly Turn

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805289669/806417372" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A passenger (right) is hugged by Cambodia Prime Minister Hun Sen after she disembarked from the MS Westerdam at the port of Sihanoukville, Cambodia, on Friday. Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Heng Sinith/AP

The first U.S. case of COVID-19 was treated at Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, Washington. Robin Addison, a nurse there, demonstrates how she wears a respirator helmet with a face shield intended to prevent infection. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

Students Caleb Lam (left), 15, and Kevin Ng, 16, have been taking online classes since the schools shut down. ""You have nothing to do at home after classes. We chat online," Lam says. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A man wearing a face mask has his temperature checked before entering a community hospital in Shanghai on Thursday. China's official death toll and infection numbers from the deadly COVID-19 coronavirus spiked dramatically on Thursday after authorities changed their counting methods. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

A Change In How 1 Chinese Province Reports Coronavirus Adds Thousands Of Cases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805519117/805556302" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The scientific community has lots of feelings about emoji representation. Geologists are excited about the new rock emoji, for example, but reviews are mixed when it comes to the fly. Emojipedia hide caption

toggle caption
Emojipedia

Scientists ♥ Their Emojis, But It's Complicated

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805202513/805397110" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The city of Wuhan, epicenter of the current coronavirus outbreak. Jia Yu/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jia Yu/Getty Images

Can Coronavirus Be Crushed By Warmer Weather?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805256402/805397122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript