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Shots - Health News

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Matthew Fentress was diagnosed with heart disease that developed after a bout of the flu in 2014. His condition worsened three years later, and he had to declare bankruptcy when he couldn't afford his medical bills, despite having insurance. Meg Vogel for KHN hide caption

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Meg Vogel for KHN

Heart Disease Bankrupted Him Once. Now He Faces Another $10,000 Medical Bill

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African Americans and other underrepresented minorities make up only about 5% of the people in genetics research studies. janiecbros/Getty Images hide caption

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janiecbros/Getty Images

Neuroscience Has A Whiteness Problem. This Research Project Aims To Fix It

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Hospitals may soon be at risk of losing a critical funding stream — Medicare funding — if they don't comply with new COVID-19 data reporting requirements. John Lamparski/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamparski/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Trump Administration Plans Crackdown On Hospitals Failing To Report COVID-19 Data

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Demonstrators march in Chicago's Old Town neighborhood in June to demand a lifting of the Illinois rent control ban and a cancellation of rent and mortgage payments. The pandemic's financial pressures are causing many Americans to struggle with rent payments. Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images

'No One Can Live Off $240 A Week': Many Americans Struggle To Pay Rent, Bills

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Researchers in Miami hold syringes containing either a placebo or the candidate COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna. Their work is part of a phase three clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Taimy Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Taimy Alvarez/AP

Nurse Kathe Olmstead (right) gives volunteer Melissa Harting an injection in a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

With Limited COVID-19 Vaccine Doses, Who Would Get Them First?

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More than 65% of the nation's small, rural hospitals took out loans from Medicare when the pandemic hit. Many now face repayment at a time when they are under great financial strain. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Demonstrators pray in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on July 8, a day the court ruled that employers with religious objections can decline to provide contraception coverage under the Affordable Care Act. With the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the ACA's future is in doubt. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Future Of The Affordable Care Act In A Supreme Court Without Ginsburg

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Niticia Mpanga, a registered respiratory therapist, checks on an ICU patient at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas. The mortality rates from COVID-19 in ICUs have been decreasing worldwide, doctors say, at least partly because of recent advances in treatment. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

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In her new book, Modern Madness: An Owner's Manual, Terri Cheney, who lives with bipolar disorder, shares advice for dealing with anxiety and depression and helping loved ones through a crisis. Neha Gupta/Getty Images hide caption

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Neha Gupta/Getty Images

English coronavirus patients George Gilbert, 85, and his wife, Domneva Gilbert, 84, were part of a clinical trial that included Eli Lilly & Co.'s baricitinib. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Experimental Medicines For COVID-19 Could Help Someday, But Home Runs Not Guaranteed

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Nicole Xu for NPR

How The Pandemic Is Widening The Racial Wealth Gap

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About 1 In 5 Households In U.S. Cities Miss Needed Medical Care During Pandemic

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Scientists used light to control the firing of specific cells to artificially create a rhythm in the brain that acted like the drug ketamine enjoynz/Getty Images hide caption

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enjoynz/Getty Images

Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine

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Shots - Health News

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