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A local gospel quintet entertains Sterling residents on a recent Tuesday evening. Frank Morris hide caption

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Frank Morris
Ruth Talbot/NPR

13 States Make Contact Tracing Data Public. Here's What They're Learning

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Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is calling on Americans to do their part to contain the coronavirus as flu season comes into view. Kevin Dietsch/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, pictured last month, withdrew litigation against Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and the City Council over a requirement to wear masks in public and other restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

When $600 Goes Away

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Belvin Jefferson White poses with a portrait of her father, Saymon Jefferson, who died from COVID-19, in Baton Rouge, La., in May. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

A voter places a ballot in a secure box in Providence, R.I., in June for the state's presidential primary. The U.S. Supreme Court says the state can suspend its witness or notary requirement to vote by mail in the fall elections. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Jennifer Austin, a recovery coach who has struggled with addiction, usually hosts Narcotics Anonymous classes at this Salvation Army center in Ogdensburg, N.Y. They've been canceled because of the pandemic, leaving more people vulnerable to relapse and overdose. "I've had people I've never worked with before reach out to me and say, 'Jen, what do I do?'" Austin said. Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NPR

U.S. Sees Deadly Drug Overdose Spike During Pandemic

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As Harris Launches Pioneering Candidacy, Conservative Pundits Aim At Her Heritage

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Face coverings are required in certain situations in many parts of the country, including Summit County near Park City, Utah. Kim Raff/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Raff/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Emergency medical technician Breonna Taylor, 26, was shot and killed by police in her home in March. Her name and those of others have become rallying cries in protests against police brutality and social injustice. Taylor Family hide caption

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Taylor Family

Marjorie Taylor Greene (right) is likely to bring a far-right conspiracy theory to the House of Representatives next year. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

From Fringe To Congress: QAnon Backers Are On The Ballot In November

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Corn plants are pushed over in a damaged field in Tama, Iowa. Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds said that early estimates indicate that 10 million acres, or nearly a third of the state's cropland, was damaged in a powerful storm. Daniel Acker/Getty Images hide caption

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Tech companies are under enormous pressure from government officials to prevent their platforms from being used by foreign actors and others to disrupt the 2020 election, as occurred in 2016. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Top Facebook Official: Our Aim Is To Make Lying On The Platform 'More Difficult'

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Democratic presidential nominee and former Vice President Joe Biden with his vice presidential running mate, Senator Kamala Harris, on August 12. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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The Big 12 says its schools will start playing their conference games in late September, under a schedule that's been reduced due to the coronavirus. The conference hopes to hold a championship game in December. Ronald Martinez/Getty Images hide caption

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