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American evacuees from the Diamond Princess cruise ship arrive at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland on Monday in San Antonio, Texas. Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images hide caption

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Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images

June (left) and Mary Kelly with a photo of their mother, Marilyn Kelly. Marilyn was living at Our House Too, in Rutland, Vt., before she died. James Buck/VPR/Seven Days hide caption

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James Buck/VPR/Seven Days

In this March 2, 1995 file photo, Word of Faith Fellowship church leader Jane Whaley talks to members of the media, accompanied by her husband, Sam, in Spindale, N.C. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

Word Of Faith's Pattern Of Abuse 'Got Worse Over Time,' Says 'Broken Faith' Author

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The Santa Fe Rail Depot in downtown Redlands, Calif., is the center of one of three "transit villages' where the city is trying to create livable, walkable communities. Benjamin Purper/KVCR hide caption

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Benjamin Purper/KVCR

Amid Climate And Housing Crises, Cities Struggle To Place Housing Near Transit

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President Bill Clinton delivers a speech during Memorial Day ceremonies at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in 1993. Ron Edmonds/AP hide caption

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Ron Edmonds/AP

Opinion: A Lesson From Memorial Day, 1993

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JerriAnne Boggis, executive director of the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire, poses with a monument that was erected in Harriet E. Wilson's honor. Boggis says when she read Wilson's book, she felt as if it was written the book just for her. Jack Rodolico /New Hampshire Public Radio hide caption

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Jack Rodolico /New Hampshire Public Radio

Los Angeles District Attorney Jackie Lacey announced she has asked a judge to wipe out and seal cannabis-related convictions dating back to 1956. It's the culmination of a partnership with the nonprofit group Code for America which used computer-based algorithms to identify eligible cases. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

A federal appeals court has upheld a ruling that blocked work requirements in Arkansas and in Kentucky, which has since rescinded them. Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar is seen testifying before the Senate Finance Committee on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Attendees recite the Pledge of Allegiance during the United Against Hate rally by the Washington Three Percent in Seattle last month. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

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Jim Urquhart for NPR

'Not A Paramilitary.' Inside A Washington Militia's Efforts To Go Mainstream

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Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signs bill honoring the state's pioneering women suffragists on Wednesday. He's surrounded by state senators and representatives, and his wife, who are all wearing the yellow rose symbolizing suffrage. Utah Governor's Office hide caption

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Utah Governor's Office

Power Of The Past: Retelling Utah's Suffragist History To Empower Modern Women

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E.F. Wen (left) and Eddie Chang in 1973. Courtesy of the Chang family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Chang family

After His Wife's Death, A Dad Tells His Daughter That Grief Can Be A Gift

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Juliet García, former president of the University of Texas at Brownsville, stands behind the border wall. Verónica G. Cárdenas for NPR hide caption

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Verónica G. Cárdenas for NPR

Between President Trump's Border Wall And The Rio Grande Lies A 'No Man's Land'

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Middle school students at Everglades K-8 Center in Miami are working on a magazine about mass shootings and hope to distribute it to every member of Congress. Jessica Bakeman /WLRN hide caption

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Jessica Bakeman /WLRN

Miami Middle School Students Hope Their Magazine Will Help End Gun Violence

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A Republican party observer, right, watches as an employee at the Palm Beach County Supervisor Of Elections office goes through a stack of damaged ballots, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP