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This photo taken with a drone shows portions of a Norfolk and Southern freight train that derailed Friday night in East Palestine, Ohio, are still on fire at mid-day Saturday. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

President Biden speaks to reporters after arriving in Hagerstown, Md., on Saturday. He congratulated the aviators who took down the Chinese balloon. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

People look at a dead gray whale at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Calif., in May 2019, a year when 122 gray whales died in the U.S., according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Last year, 47 of the whales died. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Rep. George Santos, R-N.Y., waits for the start of a session in the House chamber as the House meets for the fourth day to elect a speaker and convene the 118th Congress in Washington, D.C., Friday, Jan. 6. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Santos took office one month ago and his New York district says he's got to go

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Eye-popping egg prices have finally started to fall. Wholesale eggs in the Midwest market dropped by 58 cents to $3.29 a dozen at the end of January, according to USDA data. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Eggs prices drop, but the threat from avian flu isn't over yet

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Arctic sea smoke rises from the the Atlantic Ocean as a passenger ferry passes Spring Point Ledge Light, on Saturday, off the coast of South Portland, Maine. The morning temperature was about minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

In this photo provided by Melissa Smith, a train fire is seen from her farm in East Palestine, Ohio, Friday. A train derailment and resulting large fire prompted an evacuation order in the Ohio village near the Pennsylvania state line. Melissa Smith via AP hide caption

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Melissa Smith via AP

Kaitlyn Arland drives in her car in Junction City, Kan. Two years ago, when she tried to buy her first car, the dealership called her back and demanded she sign a new deal with a higher down payment after she had taken the car home. This tactic is often referred to as a yo-yo deal. Arin Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Arin Yoon for NPR

Even after you think you bought a car, dealerships can 'yo-yo' you and take it back

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The sign for Glen Oaks Alzheimer's Special Care Center is seen on Google Earth. The facility pronounced a living woman dead and is being fined $10,000. Google Earth/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google Earth/Screenshot by NPR

Gas utilities and cooking stove manufacturers knew for decades that burners could be made that emit less pollution in homes, but they chose not to. That may may be about to change. Sean Gladwell/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gladwell/Getty Images

Gas stove makers have a pollution solution. They're just not using it

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John Reynolds outside of the Post Office on Christmas, a regular part of his job. Christine Gale Reynolds hide caption

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Christine Gale Reynolds

The Yosemite postmaster retires after more than 40 years (and a whole lot of mail)

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Sheriff Mike Boudreaux speaks to the media near the scene of a fatal shooting in Visalia, Calif., on Jan. 16. Boudreaux said Friday that two gang members suspected in the massacre of six people last month in central California have been arrested, one after a gunbattle. Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP, File hide caption

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Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP, File

A teacher lines up the students for school-prepared lunches at Madison Crossing Elementary School in Canton, Miss. in 2019. The USDA unveiled new nutrition standards for school meals that would limit sugar and sodium. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Majid Khan, a 42-year-old Pakistani man, was released from the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, on Thursday. Pictured here in 2022, he was sent to Belize after suing for unlawful imprisonment. Center for Constitutional Rights hide caption

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Center for Constitutional Rights

A Guantánamo inmate was released to Belize after suing for wrongful imprisonment

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Bobi, a 30-year-old livestock guardian dog from Portugal, evaded death when he was born. Today, he is considered the world's oldest dog ever. Guinness World Records hide caption

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Guinness World Records