Investigations Read the latest from NPR's investigative team. If you have solid tips or documents on stories we should probe, please send them to us.

Investigations

Federal judges have enormous power over their courtrooms and their chambers, which can leave employees vulnerable to abuse, with few ways to report their concerns anonymously. Chelsea Beck for NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck for NPR

Victims of harassment by federal judges often find the judiciary is above the law

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A historical marker found in Eufaula, Ala. Andi Rice for NPR hide caption

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Andi Rice for NPR

A lethal injection gurney is seen at the at Nevada State Prison, a former penitentiary in Carson City, Nev., in 2022. Emily Najera for NPR hide caption

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Emily Najera for NPR

States botched more executions of Black prisoners. Experts think they know why

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Edmund Garcia, an Iraq War veteran, stands outside his home in Rosharon, Texas. Like many vets, he was told if he took a mortgage forbearance, his monthly payments wouldn't go up afterward. Joseph Bui for NPR hide caption

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Joseph Bui for NPR

The cargo ship Dali sits in the water, surrounded by four concrete dolphins, after running into and collapsing the Francis Scott Key Bridge on March 26, 2024, in Baltimore. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Concrete structures meant to protect Baltimore bridge appear unchanged for decades

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Police recovery crews work near the collapsed Francis Scott Key Bridge after it was struck by the container ship Dali in Baltimore. Eight members of a construction crew repairing potholes were on the bridge when the structure fell into the Patapsco River at around 1:30 a.m. on Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

'We got workers in the water': Audio reveals new details of Baltimore bridge rescue

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Attorney John Eastman faced disciplinary charges from the California State Bar for his role in Donald Trump's legal effort to remain in power after losing the 2020 presidential election. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Alexis Ratcliff attends her 18th birthday party at the hospital in Winston-Salem, N.C. She is a quadriplegic who uses a ventilator and has lived at Atrium Health Wake Forest Baptist since she was 13. Susan Ratcliff hide caption

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Susan Ratcliff

A hospital is suing to move a quadriplegic 18-year-old to a nursing home. She says no

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Left: A photo provided by Alabama Department of Corrections shows inmate Kenneth Eugene Smith, who was convicted in a 1988 murder-for-hire slaying of a preacher's wife. Right: Alabama's lethal injection chamber at Holman Correctional Facility in Atmore, Ala., seen in 2002. Alabama Department of Corrections via AP and AP hide caption

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Alabama Department of Corrections via AP and AP

Alabama executes man by nitrogen gas for the first time in the U.S.

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This undated photo provided by Alabama Department of Corrections shows inmate Kenneth Eugene Smith, who was convicted in a 1988 murder-for-hire slaying of a preacher's wife. Alabama plans to put him to death by nitrogen hypoxia, an execution method that is authorized in three states but has never been used, later this week. Alabama Department of Corrections via AP /AP hide caption

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Alabama Department of Corrections via AP /AP

Former President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in September 2022. At the rally, Trump invited the president and founder of the nonprofit Patriot Freedom Project to give a speech. The group's close ties to Trump have prompted scrutiny from lawmakers. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

The Alabama Department of Corrections plans to execute Kenneth Smith on Jan. 25 using nitrogen gas. It will be the first time the gas has been used as an execution method in the U.S. AP/Mark Harris for NPR hide caption

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AP/Mark Harris for NPR

Kenneth Smith could be the first person executed with nitrogen gas. He spoke with NPR

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Donald Trump launched his latest presidential campaign with a rally in Waco, Texas. At the beginning of the rally, Trump played a song featuring the J6 Prison Choir, made up of defendants in jail on charges related to the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol. Nathan Howard/AP hide caption

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Nathan Howard/AP

The Trump campaign embraces Jan. 6 rioters with money and pardon promises

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Autopsies are not required for federal prison deaths that are classified as natural. NPR found cases where medical neglect, poor prison conditions and a lack of resources contributed to these deaths. But families were given little information. Dion MBD for NPR hide caption

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Dion MBD for NPR

There is little scrutiny of 'natural' deaths behind bars

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Sen. Mark Kelly, D-Ariz., speaks during a hearing of a Senate Armed Services Committee subcommittee. A combat veteran, Kelly called on the U.S. Marines to explain why wounded troops weren't told the truth about a friendly fire incident in Iraq in 2004. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

The Virginia Department of Corrections recorded the execution of Travis Spencer's brother. Spencer wants his tape published to hold the state accountable. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Families of executed prisoners want death penalty tapes made public

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Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives with attorney Todd Blanche. Photo by Mark Peterson-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo by Mark Peterson-Pool/Getty Images

Trump was found guilty on all counts. What comes next?

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Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives for his hush money trial at Manhattan Criminal Court on May 28, 2024 in New York City. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Closing arguments for Trump's trial have been made. What now?

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New York Supreme Court Judge Juan Merchan listens as Emil Bove, a member of former President Donald Trump's legal team, argues for his client during Sandoval's hearing. Jane Rosenberg/AP hide caption

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Jane Rosenberg/AP

Here are three possible outcomes in the Trump hush money trial

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