Your Health News and commentary about personal health, medicine, healthcare, drugs, diet, recipes, and nutrition. Download the Your Health podcast and subscribe to our RSS feed.

Your Health

The U.S. hit a tragic milestone Tuesday, recording more than 200,000 coronavirus deaths. Here, Chris Duncan, whose 75-year-old mother, Constance, died from COVID-19 on her birthday, visits a COVID Memorial Project installation of 20,000 U.S. flags on the National Mall. The flags are on the grounds of the Washington Monument, facing the White House. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Niticia Mpanga, a registered respiratory therapist, checks on an ICU patient at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas. The mortality rates from COVID-19 in ICUs have been decreasing worldwide, doctors say, at least partly because of recent advances in treatment. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/914374901/914949310" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In her new book, Modern Madness: An Owner's Manual, Terri Cheney, who lives with bipolar disorder, shares advice for dealing with anxiety and depression and helping loved ones through a crisis. Neha Gupta/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Neha Gupta/Getty Images
Kaz Fantone/NPR

About 1 In 5 Households In U.S. Cities Miss Needed Medical Care During Pandemic

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/913647638/913823097" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A child washes her hands at a day care center in Connecticut last month. A detailed look at COVID-19 deaths in U.S. kids and young adults by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the great majority are children of color. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Hill/AP

Architects say making the office more like the outdoors — with filtered air and good ventilation — will be a priority post-pandemic. This living wall in the Danielle N. Ripich Commons at the University of New England in Biddeford, Maine, is one such approach. Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images
Jesse Zhang for NPR

A COVID-19 Vaccine May Be Only 50% Effective. Is That Good Enough?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/911987987/912612344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Esther Perel speaks from the TED stage. Bret Hartman/TED hide caption

toggle caption
Bret Hartman/TED

Esther Perel: How Can We Develop Resilience In Our Relationships?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/911398921/911868027" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A patron stands in front of a shelf full of wine bottles at a liquor story in the Brooklyn borough of New York City on March 20. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Hangover From Alcohol Boom Could Last Long After Pandemic Ends

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/908773533/911828472" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The annual town meeting in North Andover, Mass., which dates back to 1646, was held outside on June 16 on a high school football field to help keep participants a safe distance from each other. Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

People roamed the beach in Ocean City, N.J, at the start of August. As Labor Day weekend arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says Americans should remain vigilant to avoid another surge in coronavirus infection rates. Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Another Holiday Weekend, Another Coronavirus Surge? Keep An Eye On Tourist Hot Spots

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/909125729/909548985" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This negative-stained transmission electron micrograph depicts the ultrastructural details of an influenza virus particle, or virion. Frederick Murphy/CDC hide caption

toggle caption
Frederick Murphy/CDC

Flu Season Looms And Scientists Wonder How Flu And COVID-19 Might Mix

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/909000378/909312864" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A walk through the streets of New York during the pandemic echoes the loneliness and isolation many Americans are feeling in their battle against a virus that has brought multiple traumas — with no end in sight. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Pandemic's Emotional Hammer Hits Hard

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/908551297/908874124" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gyms are reopening with fewer people and more protocols, and they want to rehabilitate their pandemic-battered image. Although there's not much evidence, they say the science is on their side. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Making Gyms Safer: Why The Virus Is Less Likely To Spread There Than In A Bar

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/906649390/910294775" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

'Disease tolerance' is the ability of an individual, due to a genetic predisposition or some aspect of behavior or lifestyle, to thrive despite being infected with an amount of pathogen that sickens others. It might play a role in asymptomatic coronavirus infections. Alexander Spatari/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Spatari/Getty Images

An urgent care worker wears personal protective equipment in drive-up testing for the coronavirus in the Los Angeles area. Leading public health scientists tell journalist Alexis Madrigal that widespread at-home testing could help contain the virus. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Winter/Getty Images

'Radical' Coronavirus Testing Plan Could Offer A 'Return To Normal,' Journalist Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/906585001/906751378" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"Before the appendectomy, I was looking for property and homes to purchase, and that is pretty much completely off the table right now," says Shannon Harness, a veteran who was uninsured when he had two appendicitis-related surgeries in 2019. The bills amounted to $80,232. Rachel Woolf for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Rachel Woolf for KHN

Veteran's Appendectomy Launches Excruciating, Months-Long Battle Over Bill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/904517805/905755524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript