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It wasn't easy in early March to get a test in the U.S. confirming you had the coronavirus — scarce availability of tests meant patients had to meet strict criteria linked to a narrow set of symptoms and particular travel history. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Specimens collected from multiple people can be combined into one batch to test for the coronavirus. A negative result would clear all the specimens. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Pooling Coronavirus Tests Can Spare Scarce Supplies, But There's A Catch

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Peet Sapsin directs clients inside custom built "Gainz Pods", during his HIIT class, (high intensity interval training), at Sapsins Inspire South Bay Fitness, Redondo Beach, California, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Recent protests in Philadelphia and across the country have drawn young people. But for most of the pandemic, youth have been quarantined and away from their social circles, which could make depression and other mental illness worse. Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Why Some Young People Fear Social Isolation More Than COVID-19

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Insurers must cover coronavirus testing, according to federal law, but medical visits to discuss symptoms may not be covered, unless a test is ordered at that time. ER Productions Limited/Getty Images hide caption

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

She Went To The ER To Try To Get A Coronavirus Test And Ended Up $1,840 In Debt

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Clare Schneider/NPR

Want To Be Happier? Evidence-Based Tricks To Get You There

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Alexis McGill Johnson becomes the permanent president and CEO of Planned Parenthood after serving in the role on an interim basis. Here, she addresses a rally against white supremacy last year in Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. Marlena Sloss/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marlena Sloss/The Washington Post via Getty Images

This image shows the buildup of toxic tau proteins in the medial temporal gyrus of a human brain. Though some drugs can now remove these proteins, that hasn't seemed to ease Alzheimer's symptoms. It's time to look more deeply into how the cells work, scientists say. UW Medicine hide caption

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UW Medicine

Alzheimer's Researchers Go Back To Basics To Find The Best Way Forward

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Becky Harlan/NPR

As normal activities such as dining out resume, there has been an increase in cases in people in their 20s and 30s in pockets around the country. Some experts say it's because of lack of social distancing and mask wearing. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Younger Adults Are Increasingly Testing Positive For The Coronavirus

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A server wears a protective face mask while attending to customers amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Bethesda, Md., on June 12. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Amid Confusion About Reopening, An Expert Explains How To Assess COVID-19 Risk

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For the many Americans who have been protesting for racial equity and and an end to police brutality, there's a risk they've been exposed to coronavirus — and could bring the virus home to loved ones. Luckily there are smart ways to mitigate those risks. Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Visitors to the New York Department of Labor are turned away at the door by personnel because of closures over coronavirus concerns in New York on March 18. New York state began offering job protections for those required, or cautioned, to self-isolate or quarantine by a government entity. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

With access to medical care limited during the pandemic, patients in countries where abortion is legal, such as Colombia, the United Kingdom and the United States, are turning to telemedicine for a prescription for drugs like mifeprostone and misoprostol to end a pregnancy. Photo Illustration by Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images
Marie Bertrand/Getty Images

Sleep Better With These Bedtime Rituals

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Elevator safety measures that take COVID-19 into account are posted at Cambridge Discovery Park, a life sciences office development in Cambridge, Mass. Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images

The artist Celos paints a mural in downtown Los Angeles on May 30, 2020 in protest against the killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Beyond Protests: 5 More Ways To Channel Anger Into Action To Fight Racism

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