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NPR Music celebrates 15 years with Yendry, Hurray for the Riff Raff, Amber Mark, and Moonchild at 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C. on November 29, 2022. (Eric Lee for NPR) Eric Lee/Eric Lee for NPR hide caption

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Eric Lee/Eric Lee for NPR

NPR Music celebrates 15 years with Yendry, Hurray for the Riff Raff, Amber Mark, and Moonchild at 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C. on November 29, 2022. (Eric Lee for NPR) Eric Lee/Eric Lee for NPR hide caption

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Eric Lee/Eric Lee for NPR

Kenny Loggins Chris Jensen/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Chris Jensen/Courtesy of the artist

Kenny Loggins on World Cafe

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The 1975 Samuel Bradley/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Samuel Bradley/Courtesy of the artist

The 1975 on World Cafe

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Julieta Venegas Agustina Puricelli/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Agustina Puricelli/Courtesy of the artist

Julieta Venegas on World Cafe

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Mariah Carey performs at the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony in 2014 in New York City. Patent authorities have decided she can't be the only "Queen of Christmas." Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP hide caption

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Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

Brandi Carlile (by Neil Krug), Keb' Mo' (by Jeremy Cowart), Wet Leg (by Hollie Fernando) Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

Brandi Carlile on World Cafe

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Maggie Rogers Olivia Bee/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Olivia Bee/Courtesy of the artist

Maggie Rogers on World Cafe

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"I want to see more opportunities for women who have a message, who are dark-skinned," says Jessy Wilson, whose uplifting "Keep Rising" with Angélique Kidjo closes the historical epic The Woman King. Mary Caroline Russell hide caption

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Mary Caroline Russell

How a triumphant anthem for 'The Woman King' brought Jessy Wilson back to music

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Meghan Trainor, performing at LA Pride on June 8, 2019, in West Hollywood. Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

Meghan Trainor rediscovers her self-love as a new mom

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