Steve Inskeep Steve Inskeep is a host of NPR's Morning Edition and Up First.
Steve Inskeep, photographed for NPR, 13 May 2019, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Steve Inskeep

Mike Morgan/NPR
Steve Inskeep, photographed for NPR, 13 May 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Steve Inskeep

Host, Morning Edition and Up First

Steve Inskeep is a host of NPR's Morning Edition, as well as NPR's morning news podcast Up First.

Known for interviews with presidents and Congressional leaders, Inskeep has a passion for stories of the less famous: Pennsylvania truck drivers, Kentucky coal miners, U.S.-Mexico border detainees, Yemeni refugees, California firefighters, American soldiers.

Since joining Morning Edition in 2004, Inskeep has hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, Cairo, and Beijing; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "The Price of African Oil," on conflict in Nigeria. He has taken listeners on a 2,428-mile journey along the U.S.-Mexico border, and 2,700 miles across North Africa. He is a repeat visitor to Iran and has covered wars in Syria and Yemen.

Inskeep says Morning Edition works to "slow down the news," making sense of fast-moving events. A prime example came during the 2008 Presidential campaign, when Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris conducted "The York Project," groundbreaking conversations about race, which received an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence.

Inskeep was hired by NPR in 1996. His first full-time assignment was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush. After the Sept. 11 attacks, he covered the war in Afghanistan, turmoil in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid gone wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of NPR News teams awarded the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for coverage of Iraq.

On days of bad news, Inskeep is inspired by the Langston Hughes book, Laughing to Keep From Crying. Of hosting Morning Edition during the 2008 financial crisis and Great Recession, he told Nuvo magazine when "the whole world seemed to be falling apart, it was especially important for me ... to be amused, even if I had to be cynically amused, about the things that were going wrong. Laughter is a sign that you're not defeated."

Inskeep is the author of Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi, a 2011 book on one of the world's great megacities. He is also author of Jacksonland, a history of President Andrew Jackson's long-running conflict with John Ross, a Cherokee chief who resisted the removal of Indians from the eastern United States in the 1830s.

He has been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, NBC's Meet the Press, MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports, CNN's Inside Politics and the PBS Newshour. He has written for publications including The New York Times, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

News Brief: Reopening Consequences, Charges Related To Epstein Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/887027319/887027320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: Coronavirus Testing, Russian Bounties, China Enacts Security Law

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/885141836/885141837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two Mississippi state flags wave outside the Capitol in Jackson, Miss., in 2019. State lawmakers voted to retire the current flag, and Mississippi GOP Gov. Tate Reeves is expected to sign the measure. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Mississippi Black Lawmaker On Taking Down The Flag: A Symbol Of 'Hate And Not Love'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/884551405/884551406" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: COVID-19 Curve, Russian Bounties, 'White Power' Tweet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/884551307/884551308" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation, by Kristin Kobes Du Mez Liveright hide caption

toggle caption
Liveright

'Jesus And John Wayne' Explores Christian Manhood — And How Belief Can Bolster Trump

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/881992622/881992623" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: Bolton Book, Atlanta Officer Charged, Fla. COVID-19 Cases Surge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/879892128/879892129" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: Policing Order, U.S. Troops In Germany, Hanging Deaths Probed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/877778763/877778764" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Rev. Jesse Jackson and Josie Johnson. Jeff Haynes/AFP via Getty Images; Jerry Holt/Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Haynes/AFP via Getty Images; Jerry Holt/Star Tribune via Getty Images

'Marchers Are Full Of Hope': Civil Rights Leaders See Progress In Today's Movement

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/871030891/871803258" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: Black Men's Deaths Resonate, Trump's Response To Unrest

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/870227910/870227911" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Retired Gen. Martin Dempsey, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is speaking out against President Trump's call to use military force to suppress nationwide protests over police brutality. Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Former Joint Chiefs Chairman Condemns Trump's Threat To Use Military At Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/870004024/870227999" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: Mattis Criticizes Trump, Officers Charged, Job Market

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/869282780/869282781" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: Trump Threatens Military Action To Stop Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/867578050/867578051" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: Protests Over George Floyd's Death Show No Signs Of Letting Up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/866540157/866540158" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Coronavirus Pandemic Leaves Millions Of Americans Unemployed, Hungry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/862921703/862924179" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript