Lulu Garcia-Navarro Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday and one of the hosts of NPR's morning news podcast Up First.
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Lulu Garcia-Navarro

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Lulu Garcia-Navarro 2017 square
Stephen Voss/NPR

Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Host, Weekend Edition Sunday and Up First

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday and one of the hosts of NPR's morning news podcast Up First. She is infamous in the IT department of NPR for losing laptops to bullets, hurricanes, and bomb blasts.

Before joining the Sunday morning team, she served as an NPR correspondent based in Brazil, Israel, Mexico, and Iraq. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage, and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement. She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton. She has also won awards for her work on migration in Mexico and the Amazon in Brazil.

Since joining Weekend Edition Sunday, Garcia-Navarro and her team have also received a Gracie for their coverage of the #MeToo movement. She's hard at work making sure Weekend Edition brings in the voices of those who will surprise, delight, and move you, wherever they might be found.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. She was posted for the AP to Iraq before the U.S.-led invasion, where she stayed covering the conflict.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in international relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London.

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Photo by Kevin Abosch

Journalist Maria Hinojosa Tells Latinos, Silenced Voices: 'We Need You'

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Kevin J. Watkins/Courtesy of the artist

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Patti Perret/Orion Pictures

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Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, wave to crowds outside Windsor Castle after their wedding in May 2018. Aaron Chown/WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Royal Reporters Chart Harry And Meghan's Journey In 'Finding Freedom'

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Silvio Avila/AFP via Getty Images

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Richmond, Va., Photographer Watches Familiar Anger Resurface In Recent Protests

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