Consider This from NPR Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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Consider This from NPR

From NPR

Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

Maria Arechiga (center) helps move an intubated COVID-19 patient to a private room. The patient died later that day. Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

'Battlefield Medicine' In Los Angeles ICU As Biden Launches 'Wartime Effort'

More than 400,000 Americans have been killed by the coronavirus. That's more Americans than were killed in all of World War II, President Biden pointed out this week. He calls his new plan to fight the pandemic a "wartime effort."

'Battlefield Medicine' In Los Angeles ICU As Biden Launches 'Wartime Effort'

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President Biden prepares to sign a series of executive orders in the Oval Office just hours after his inauguration on Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

How President Biden's Immigration Plan Would Undo Trump's Signature Policies

President Biden followed through on a day-one promise to send a massive immigration reform bill to Congress. Now the hard part: passing that bill into law.

How President Biden's Immigration Plan Would Undo Trump's Signature Policies

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Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts on Wednesday. Andrew Harnik/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Getty Images

President Biden Hails 'Democracy's Day' In Unprecedented Transfer Of Power

"Through a crucible for the ages, America has been tested anew," President Biden said in his inaugural address on Wednesday. "And America has risen to the challenge."

President Biden Hails 'Democracy's Day' In Unprecedented Transfer Of Power

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When Joe Biden takes the oath of office at noon eastern time on Wednesday, he will become the oldest president ever to hold the office. His journey to the White House spans nearly half a century in public life. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

The 46th President: How Tragedy And Resilience Prepared Joe Biden To Meet A Moment

When Joe Biden takes the oath of office at noon ET on Wednesday, he will become the oldest president to ever hold the office. His journey to the White House spans nearly half a century in public life.

The 46th President: How Tragedy And Resilience Prepared Joe Biden To Meet A Moment

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President-elect Joe Biden's plan is to have 100 million vaccine doses administered in the first 100 days of his administration. But first he has to convince Congress to pay for it. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

1 Year, 400,000 Dead: What Could Change This Week About America's Pandemic Response

President-elect Joe Biden has outlined a plan to administer 100 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine in his administration's first 100 days. But before that he'll have to convince Congress to pay for it.

1 Year, 400,000 Dead: What Could Change This Week About America's Pandemic Response

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A window at the US Capitol building broken during the 6 siege by supporters of US President Donald Trump. Dmitry Kirsanov/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Dmitry Kirsanov/TASS via Getty Images

BONUS: Inside The Capitol Siege

In this episode from the team at NPR's Embedded, hear the stories of two NPR teams that spent January 6th on the grounds of the Capitol — and stories from a lawmaker, photographer, and police officer who were inside the building.

BONUS: Inside The Capitol Siege

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Supporters of President Trump fly a U.S. flag with a symbol from the group QAnon as they gather outside the U.S. Capitol last Wednesday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Their Family Members Are QAnon Followers — And They're At A Loss What To Do About It

The QAnon conspiracy theory originated in 2017, when an anonymous online figure, "Q" started posting on right-wing message boards. Q claims to have top secret government clearance. Q's stories range from false notions about COVID-19 to a cabal running the U.S. government to the claim there's a secret world of satanic pedophiles. This culminates in the belief that President Trump is a kind of savior figure.

Their Family Members Are QAnon Followers — And They're At A Loss What To Do About It

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A medical worker in personal protective equipment seals a swab sample inside a South Africa Health Department mobile coronavirus testing unit at O.R. Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg last week. Guillem Sartorio/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillem Sartorio/Bloomberg via Getty Images

What The COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Looks Like Across The World

President-Elect Biden's plan to attack COVID-19 includes a $20 billion plan for vaccine distribution in the U.S., hiring 100,000 public health workers to do vaccine outreach and contact tracing, and funding to ensure supplies of crucial vaccine components like small glass vials.

What The COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Looks Like Across The World

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Weapons are distributed to members of the National Guard outside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. The Capitol complex has added additional security measures and personnel following the insurrection at the Capitol last week. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

House Votes To Impeach, All Eyes On McConnell Amid Concerns About More Violence

House Democrats — joined by 10 Republicans — voted to impeach President Trump on Wednesday. Now the process moves to the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he hasn't made a final decision — and that he'll listen to the legal arguments presented in the Senate. GOP strategist Scott Jennings, who is familiar with McConnell's thinking, spoke to NPR about why that might be.

House Votes To Impeach, All Eyes On McConnell Amid Concerns About More Violence

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President Trump waves as he walks to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Trump is facing a second impeachment after last week's insurrection at the Capitol. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Extremists Face Charges As House Moves Toward Impeachment

California Rep. Adam Schiff, who led House Democrats in their first effort to impeach President Trump, tells NPR what they are hoping to achieve in doing it a second time. He spoke to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly.

Extremists Face Charges As House Moves Toward Impeachment

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