Consider This from NPR Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered and Kelly McEvers from Embedded help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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Consider This from NPR

From NPR

Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered and Kelly McEvers from Embedded help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

"You didn't just rob me and my family, you robbed the world of a queen," Breonna Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, said in a statement read aloud Friday by Palmer's sister, Bianca Austin. In this photo, Ju'Niyah Palmer embraces her mother. Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

What's Next For Breonna Taylor's Family, And The Movement That Followed Her Death

The Kentucky attorney general said this week that police were "justified" in the shooting that killed Breonna Taylor during a botched narcotics raid, and no charges were brought against any officers in her death. The only charges brought were against one officer whose shots went into another apartment. That announcement touched off more protests in Louisville and around the country.

What's Next For Breonna Taylor's Family, And The Movement That Followed Her Death

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The Taj Mahal reopened to visitors on Monday in a symbolic business-as-usual gesture even as India looks set to overtake the U.S. as the global leader in coronavirus infections. Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

How Countries Around The World Are Coping With New Surge In Coronavirus Cases

India is poised to overtake the U.S. as the country with the most COVID-19 cases. This week the Taj Mahal reopened to tourists for the first time in more than six months. NPR correspondent Lauren Frayer reports on how that's not an indication that the pandemic there has subsided.

How Countries Around The World Are Coping With New Surge In Coronavirus Cases

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Members of CASA, an advocacy organization for Latino and immigrant people, hold up white roses in honor of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR

What The SCOTUS Vacancy Means for Abortion — And The 2020 Election

This week Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol. She'll be the first woman in history to do so.

What The SCOTUS Vacancy Means for Abortion — And The 2020 Election

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Protesters march on September 7 following the release of video evidence that showed the death of Daniel Prude while in the custody of Rochester Police in Rochester, N.Y. Maranie R. Staab/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Maranie R. Staab/AFP via Getty Images

White Support For BLM Falls, And A Key Police Reform Effort Is Coming Up Short

Daniel Prude died of asphyxia a week after his brother called 911 on March 23. His death was ruled a homicide. Joe Prude told NPR his brother was having a mental health crisis.

White Support For BLM Falls, And A Key Police Reform Effort Is Coming Up Short

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Emergency medics from the Houston Fire Department try to save the life of a nursing home resident in cardiac arrest on August 12 in Houston, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

With Nearly 200,000 Dead, Health Care Workers Struggle To Endure

The coronavirus has killed nearly 200,000 people in America — far more than in any other country, according to Johns Hopkins University. And experts are predicting a new spike of cases this fall.

With Nearly 200,000 Dead, Health Care Workers Struggle To Endure

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An aerial view shows street flooding in Gulf Shores, Ala., after Hurricane Sally passed through the area on Thursday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Costs Of Climate Change Continue To Rise As Storms Become More Destructive

There have been so many tropical storms this year that the National Hurricane Center has already made it through the alphabet to name the storms. The last storm name started with "W" (there are no X, Y or Z names). Now, storms will be named using the Greek alphabet.

Costs Of Climate Change Continue To Rise As Storms Become More Destructive

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Absentee ballot election workers stuff ballot applications at the Mecklenburg County Board of Elections office in Charlotte, N.C. on September 4. Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

This Election Season Is Shaping Up To Be The Most Litigated Ever

During the 2000 Presidential election season, it took 36 days and a Supreme Court decision before George W. Bush became the 43rd president of the United States.

This Election Season Is Shaping Up To Be The Most Litigated Ever

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Emergency medical technician Breonna Taylor, 26, was shot and killed by police in her home in March. Her name has become a rallying cry in protests against police brutality and social injustice. Her friends and family remember Taylor as a caring person who loved her job in health care and enjoyed playing cards with her aunts. Taylor Family hide caption

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Taylor Family

Who Was Breonna Taylor Before She Became The Face Of A Movement?

Breonna Taylor was shot and killed by police in March. Her killing in Louisville, Ky., was part of the fuel for the nationwide protests against police brutality and systemic racism this spring and summer.

Who Was Breonna Taylor Before She Became The Face Of A Movement?

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Firefighters are seen on scene at Cressman's, a landmark Shaver Lake general store and gas station where only the sign remains standing after being lost to the Creek Fire in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains on September 11, 2020. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Conspiracies Add Fuel To An Already Challenging Wildfire Season

Wildfires in Western states aren't slowing down and conspiracy theories about who started them are only making things harder for responders.

Conspiracies Add Fuel To An Already Challenging Wildfire Season

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President Trump has faced repeated questions about his interviews with journalist Bob Woodward after recordings of Trump saying he knew how contagious the coronavirus was in early February. Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

Journalist Bob Woodward Says Trump Is 'The Wrong Man For The Job'

If President Trump knew how contagious and potentially deadly the coronavirus was back in February, why didn't he express that to the American public?

Journalist Bob Woodward Says Trump Is 'The Wrong Man For The Job'

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