Editors' Picks A selection of stories handpicked by NPR Music editors.

Editors' Picks

A drawing of composer William Dawson in 1935 by Aaron Douglas. Dawson's Negro Folk Symphony, long neglected, has received a new recording. Aaron Douglas/Tuskegee University Archives hide caption

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Aaron Douglas/Tuskegee University Archives

Someone Finally Remembered William Dawson's 'Negro Folk Symphony'

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Lil Baby performs during a Juneteenth voter registration rally on June 19, 2020 at Murphy Park Fairgrounds in Atlanta, Ga. One week earlier, he released "The Bigger Picture," a song protesting police brutality. Paras Griffin/Getty Images hide caption

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Paras Griffin/Getty Images

A fan of K-pop band BTS poses for photos against a backdrop featuring an image of the group's members in Seoul, South Korea, on Oct. 29, 2019. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

K-Pop's Digital 'Army' Musters To Meet The Moment, Baggage In Tow

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Colombian musician Juanes turns inward in music and conversation on this week's show. Omar Cruz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Omar Cruz/Courtesy of the artist

Juanes Turns Inward

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The term "urban" has been used for decades as a catch-all term for Black music — but it is now quickly falling out of favor in the music industry in the midst of a growing new civil rights movement. Jasper James/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasper James/Getty Images

As the profile of the masked, pseudonymous singer Orville Peck has risen, he has sometimes been held up as a solitary figure staking a queer claim to country music. But in important ways, Peck isn't alone. Tracy Hua/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tracy Hua/Courtesy of the artist

RTJ4 seems tailor-made for the present moment, but Run the Jewels has always made music about inequality and corruption in America. "In my mind, things are never not happening," Killer Mike says. Tim Saccenti/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tim Saccenti/Courtesy of the artist

On 'RTJ4,' Run The Jewels Is A Speaker Box For Society

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Natalia Lafourcade celebrates Mexican son jarocho on her new album, Un Canto Para Mexico. Manuel Zuñiga/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Manuel Zuñiga/Courtesy of the artist

Natalia Lafourcade Searches For The Soul Of Son Jarocho

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